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Dr. Harvey Domoslai, DVM


Corman Park Veterinary Services
5 miles West of Saskatoon, sk
on Highway 14 at Saskatoon Livestock Sales

Full facilities for the management of equine health issues.

Dr. Harvey Domoslai, DVM
Phone: (306) 384-7676
Emergencies: (306) 227-8331

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Horse Owner Today

Recurring Thrush Problem

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 28, 2011 10:54

Q: My horse has a bad case of thrush, I have been usuing many different store bought remedies to cure it but it seems to only be gettting worst.. what home rememby can i use... ?  thanks Devin
 
A:  First the black infected soft horn  tissue has to be removed with a hoof knife by a skilled individual, preferably your farrier. Then scrub out well with betadine or chlorhexidine scrub or even dandruff shampoo.  Rinse and dry with a towel.  If you put any medication on top of the dead tissue and the discharge it will not get to the origins of the infection and will not work. After this preparation you can apply the thrush treatment.  
Then if copper sulfate hasn't worked [the most common treatment-coppertox] you can use bleach one or maybe two times, using a small brush to get it into deeper areas .

Dr. Lisa Wayman
CPVS

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Disease | General | hoof care

Hyperflexion

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 18, 2011 09:26

I am addressing this question perhaps more as a dressage trainer and teacher than as a veterinarian, so as such this is not a definitive answer, just my opinion of this issue.

Hyperflexion is a relatively recent and controversial topic in the world of competitive dressage horse training.  Proponents of extreme hyperflexion are few but unfortunately several are famous and successful on the world championship/Olympic stage.  They claim that flexion of the horse's jaw/head far far past the vertical for extended periods of work gives more lift to the back and more elasticity to the movement when ridden up in a more normal position during a test.  There are a large majority of trainers who occasionally during schooling use an overbent longitudinal position  [behind vertical, lower neck] and also lateral positions outside of the classic desired "frame". However these positions are used for seconds only to supple or unlock a resistant jaw or to prevent an evasion in another part of the body.  As soon as possible the horse is returned to a normal vertical frame so that the classic goals of forward through the back and soft in jaw can be achieved with the poll, not the third vertebra  or mid neck the highest point.  

There are extremists on both sides [which can occupy one for hours on youtube] with some riders clearly causing physical and mental distress to the horse. In some instances permanent physical damage to vertebrae and supporting structures can occur and/or long term or permanent psychological damage including a resigned helpless and joyless horse.  On the opposite side of the spectrum, other extremists vehemently state that all horses ridden in a bit are in pain at all times and are being abused.  

Most reasonable horsemen and trainers love and respect horses and appreciate dressage as an art as well as a sport.  They certainly fall between these extremes.  I believe that realistic and fair -minded trainers are aware that at times getting a horse to comply may involve some battles of wills and bodies but we all hope this is as brief a period as possible.  

It is prudent to remember that classical dressage changed very little over the past hundred + years as far as ideals and methods are concerned.  Todays sport horses are bigger, more powerful, athletic and more extreme movers with each generation.  It is tempting to rush these fantastic horses to the FEI levels because they apparently can, but producing a horse that keeps a sound body and mind with joy in his work for his lifetime takes as long as it ever did. When a 'new' technique surfaces, such as extreme hyperflexion, I hope that riders and trainers educate themselves, talk to people they trust and continue to use good judgement in training their horses as individuals.


Dr Lisa Wayman DVM contributor to "Ask a Vet"
-Corman Park Vet Svc
-trainer of  2 Grand Prix horses and mother of 2 young horsewomen

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General | Vaccination | training | hyperflexion

Pregsure

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 12, 2011 08:08

Q:  Dr. Domoslai, Below is a link to an article re 'Pregsure' - similar to some of the drugs in the the Pfizer Gold program that we use. Hope the MLV eliminates this problem. Have you had any cases like this? 
A:  Thanks for the question Peggy.  I looked at all the North American data on MLV vaccines and any cases that might look like those bleeding calves from Pregsure vaccinated cows and could find nothing like that.  I think that Pfizer has been pretty up front with there product lines and would let us know if there was any risk or if similar cases have been seen in North America.  Sounds like an interesting distressing disease and to think that the producers who are trying to protect there cattle and do the right thing inadvertently cause the condition.  Take care. Dr. Domoslai DVS
http://www.producer.com/livestock/article.aspx?aid=41494

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Disease | reaction | Vaccination | cattle