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Dr. Harvey Domoslai, DVM


Corman Park Veterinary Services
5 miles West of Saskatoon, sk
on Highway 14 at Saskatoon Livestock Sales

Full facilities for the management of equine health issues.

Dr. Harvey Domoslai, DVM
Phone: (306) 384-7676
Emergencies: (306) 227-8331

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Interesting Cases

A Loonie sized stone was removed from this geldings urethra at the end of his penis.

Interesting Cases
Horse Owner Today

Interesting Case #8 Possible EHV-1 Neurological Herpes in Saskatchewan

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 13, 2012 06:33

March 13, 2012

"In the news at CPVS" with Dr. Domoslai.

We had a horse become progressively recumbent and euthanized her last week.

Tests are pending but differentials now are 1. Injury, 2. Neurological Herpes, or 3. Rabies.

Stay tuned for updates.

March 14, 2012

"In the news at CPVS" Dr. Domoslai, DVM euthanized a horse in the Saskatoon and district area last week. 

Injury and rabies have been ruled out as causes for the horse becoming progressively recumbent.

EHV-1 neurological herpeshas not been positively identified at this time, however the case is being investigated.

The farm is currently under quarantine.

March 15, 2012

The farm is located in the Borden, Saskatchewan area.

West Nile, when to vaccinate?

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 6, 2012 19:48

Q:  When should horse owners administer their west nile vaccine?

A:  The vaccine will be west nile plus ewt combo vaccine not just west nile virus. Best to give mid May to end of July because west nile is usually an August and September disease.
Boosting will give highest immunity in first 3 to 4 months afterwards even though protective for a whole year.
If you have a pregnant mare vaccinate one month before foaling.
If you have a foal of a vaccinated mare start a series of 3 vaccinations once a month at 3 months.  
If the mare was not vaccinated prior to foaling, start at 5 months which may mean for some it is November by the time foal is 5 months, which is after mosquito season. Those foals can be started on their series the following April so
April-May-June. Dr Lisa Wayman DVM.

Abnormal Worm Counts in Sask.

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 2, 2012 07:07

I have had a number of calls lately about horses on a regular, consistent deworming program actually passing worms.

Normally we would have a significant snow pack covering the ground, preventing

the horses from picking up parasite eggs.  Horses that are exposed to grassy

pasture are coming in contact with more eggs than normal.

The solution is to give an additional wormer now, followed by the normal wormer in April/May.

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Disease | General

Lice!

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 1, 2012 11:11

 


 

 

That time of year everyone, lice.

Lice can be present in cold weather but are not as active as when it begins to warm.

Prime lice target areas are the mane and tailhead.  Look at the base of the hairshaft for nits.  Sucking lice will be attached to the skin.  Chewing or biting lice will be frolicing about.

Treatment is to use one of the ivermectin product for the biting lice.  Crawling lice require a powered product or a spray on product.

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Disease | General | reaction

Cribbing or is it windsucking?

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   February 17, 2012 10:44

Question: A clients horse windsucks really bad, it will stop several times while it is feeding and eating hay to windsuck on anything it can get hold of. I've heard that past cases have been found to have ulcers and have been treated accordingly and although it doesn't always cure the "habit" it has had some success. Would trying it on cemetadine for a month be worthwhile? It wears a miracle collar but this has done nothing to deter it in the slightest. To say it windsucks constantly throughout the day its body condition is pretty good and so far it hasnt suffered any related health issues associated with the typical windsucker. Would appreciate your suggestions/advice. Thanks

Answer:  Thanks for your question Karen.  This vice really creates only occasional gas colic as opposed to ulcers. Cribbing (windsucking is something different)is a habit that releases endorphins in the brain so affected horses are really addicted. That is why it is considered a vice. If he is eating enough to maintain condition and the collar doesn't stop him then there isn't much to be done. You can run electric wire on all rails of his paddock, but if persistent he will crib on posts. The behaviour is a stress reliever so perhaps pasture is an option, if the cribbing is prevented he may show stress in other ways. » Dr. Lisa Wayman

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Colic | Disease | Equine Interesting Cases | General

Updated Interesting Case #7 Deep Seated Bursitis in Foal

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   February 16, 2012 19:32

The following interesting case was a one month old foal who developed a baseball size painful swelling in his neck. 

The swelling never reduced after treatments with antibiotics and antiinflamatories so we surgically removed it and found a deep seated bursitis extending from his vertebral process. 

He is doing well now. 

March 1 2012 I am very pleased with this foal's progress after the surgery, no mobility loss, minimal scars.

See photos below

Photo credit Dr. Domoslai

 

 

Gelding with Multiple Urethras

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   February 1, 2012 09:55

Q: My vet discovered my horse has 2 urethras while he was cleaning his sheath. My horse is almost 7, his urine comes out normal and in the year that I have had him, he has had no problems. Do I need to be concerened about this? I was able to watch him urinate and it looks like both urethras are used. -Linda

A:  No real problem just kinda cool! Funny what vets think is interesting ha ha. You will have to watch maybe a bit more for "beans" forming in both or one or both. -Dr Lisa Wayman

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Disease | General

Snowball feet

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 23, 2012 06:08

Q:  What causes “Snowballs” on some horses feet and not others?  Same horses in the herd have the problem.  Is there a solution besides removing them?
Thanks

A:  Shoe with snow pads, use boots for turnout, some say oil feet soles or spray with pam cooking spray before turnout but I don't know if that works or not as I haven't seen it in action. Dr. Lisa Wayman

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General | hoof care | Leg injuries

Recurring Thrush Problem

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 28, 2011 10:54

Q: My horse has a bad case of thrush, I have been usuing many different store bought remedies to cure it but it seems to only be gettting worst.. what home rememby can i use... ?  thanks Devin
 
A:  First the black infected soft horn  tissue has to be removed with a hoof knife by a skilled individual, preferably your farrier. Then scrub out well with betadine or chlorhexidine scrub or even dandruff shampoo.  Rinse and dry with a towel.  If you put any medication on top of the dead tissue and the discharge it will not get to the origins of the infection and will not work. After this preparation you can apply the thrush treatment.  
Then if copper sulfate hasn't worked [the most common treatment-coppertox] you can use bleach one or maybe two times, using a small brush to get it into deeper areas .

Dr. Lisa Wayman
CPVS

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Disease | General | hoof care

Oak Trees, Acorns & Horses

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   October 21, 2011 17:43

Q: Dr. Domoslai, My question today is about Oak Trees, Acorns and Horses. Would you be so kind to explain to the equine lovers why they are toxic to horses? I had no idea they were! I ask you to do this as I recenetly had a horrifying experience when my 8 yr. old gelding went from perfectly fine to nearly lame, lathargic, semi unresponsive and not keeping his penis retracted in his sheath. My farrier was the one that discovered him eating them. This drought in Texas has been tough & thankfully he is ok now. Sincerely, Teresa

A:  Teresa, Thanks for the question.  Acorns and the leaves and branches of the acorn tree have tannic and gallic acids which are a direct irritant to the gastro-intestinal tract of the horse.  In small amounts these will not cause any problems but in large quantities can cause ulceration in the GI tract which can lead to a host of other problems one of which can be laminitis ie founder of the foot.  Some horses develop a real taste for acorns and will seek them out and over consume.  I’d likely fence off the trees as even though the nuts and leaves are inassessible till fall.  A sudden wind storm may knock down acorns or leaves when you do not expect it and your horse may get into them.  If you know your horse has over consumed acorns or acorn leaves get your vet out and they’ll likely try and coat your horses GI tract and move the offending acorns along to limit the damage. 
Dr. Domoslai DVM CPVS

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Disease | General | poison