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Dr. Harvey Domoslai, DVM


Corman Park Veterinary Services
5 miles West of Saskatoon, sk
on Highway 14 at Saskatoon Livestock Sales

Full facilities for the management of equine health issues.

Dr. Harvey Domoslai, DVM
Phone: (306) 384-7676
Emergencies: (306) 227-8331

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Interesting Cases

A Loonie sized stone was removed from this geldings urethra at the end of his penis.

Interesting Cases
Horse Owner Today

West Nile Virus hits Saskatchewan horses

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   September 11, 2012 14:36

NOTICE: West Nile Virus in horses - update

To Sept. 7, there have been six (6) horses in Saskatchewan confirmed to have West Nile Virus. All six horses have been euthanized due to the severity of their neurological symptoms. These cases  have occurred in the RM 370 (Humboldt),  RM 65 (Tecumseh),  RM 121 (Moosomin), RM 137 (Swift Current), RM 38 (Laurier) and RM 395 (Porcupine), although this last case had recent travel history to the United States and likely contracted the virus there.

It is important to note that while listlessness and depression are often seen in cases of WNV in horses, in at least two of the cases reported here the horses remained bright and alert but remained recumbent due to severe neurological deficits.

Average daily temperatures have remained warm and above normal into the end of August and beginning of September. Though the season for the Culex tarsalis mosquito is almost over, horse owners and veterinarians should continue to watch for potential cases of West Nile Virus for the next few weeks.


Wendy Wilkins, DVM PhD
Disease Surveillance Veterinarian
Room 202
Animal Health Unit
Ministry of Agriculture
3085 Albert St
Regina, Saskatchewan
S4S 0B1
wendy.wilkins@gov.sk.ca
(306) 798-0253 (wk)

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Vaccination

Live vs Killed Vaccine

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 16, 2012 12:05

Question: Hello, I live in Wisconsin, just had my Peruvian Paso horse vaccinated with a 4 way given by my boarding facility and a West Nile that I bought. My horse reacted to the 4 way with a touch of "flu". He did not eat or move for 2 days, and after 2 weeks, he seems to be getting back to his old self. She said it was probably due to a "live virus" vaccine. What's the difference between "killed" and "live" and what is best for my horse? The last 2 years, I have given him a 4 way, and I have never seen him react like that. I really appreciate your time. Thank you so much. Sincerely, Carol Harkner

Carol:  A live virus is actually a modified live virus particle that is able to replicate and therefore stimulate a much stronger and sustained immune response in your horse.  A killed virus is just as it says killed particles that passively float in your horses body promoting immunity.   In my opinion live vaccines are always better however by there very nature are more reactive than killed vaccines.  I’d check the brand of four way used on your horse and use a different brand next year.  There sometimes is a carrier or immune modulator added to vaccines that your horse may have reacted to.  That is not saying the vaccine is no good or never worked it’s just your horse is sensitive to it. Good luck next year.
Dr. Harv

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Vaccination

Interesting Case #8 Possible EHV-1 Neurological Herpes in Saskatchewan

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 13, 2012 06:33

March 13, 2012

"In the news at CPVS" with Dr. Domoslai.

We had a horse become progressively recumbent and euthanized her last week.

Tests are pending but differentials now are 1. Injury, 2. Neurological Herpes, or 3. Rabies.

Stay tuned for updates.

March 14, 2012

"In the news at CPVS" Dr. Domoslai, DVM euthanized a horse in the Saskatoon and district area last week. 

Injury and rabies have been ruled out as causes for the horse becoming progressively recumbent.

EHV-1 neurological herpeshas not been positively identified at this time, however the case is being investigated.

The farm is currently under quarantine.

March 15, 2012

The farm is located in the Borden, Saskatchewan area.

West Nile, when to vaccinate?

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 6, 2012 19:48

Q:  When should horse owners administer their west nile vaccine?

A:  The vaccine will be west nile plus ewt combo vaccine not just west nile virus. Best to give mid May to end of July because west nile is usually an August and September disease.
Boosting will give highest immunity in first 3 to 4 months afterwards even though protective for a whole year.
If you have a pregnant mare vaccinate one month before foaling.
If you have a foal of a vaccinated mare start a series of 3 vaccinations once a month at 3 months.  
If the mare was not vaccinated prior to foaling, start at 5 months which may mean for some it is November by the time foal is 5 months, which is after mosquito season. Those foals can be started on their series the following April so
April-May-June. Dr Lisa Wayman DVM.

Hyperflexion

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 18, 2011 09:26

I am addressing this question perhaps more as a dressage trainer and teacher than as a veterinarian, so as such this is not a definitive answer, just my opinion of this issue.

Hyperflexion is a relatively recent and controversial topic in the world of competitive dressage horse training.  Proponents of extreme hyperflexion are few but unfortunately several are famous and successful on the world championship/Olympic stage.  They claim that flexion of the horse's jaw/head far far past the vertical for extended periods of work gives more lift to the back and more elasticity to the movement when ridden up in a more normal position during a test.  There are a large majority of trainers who occasionally during schooling use an overbent longitudinal position  [behind vertical, lower neck] and also lateral positions outside of the classic desired "frame". However these positions are used for seconds only to supple or unlock a resistant jaw or to prevent an evasion in another part of the body.  As soon as possible the horse is returned to a normal vertical frame so that the classic goals of forward through the back and soft in jaw can be achieved with the poll, not the third vertebra  or mid neck the highest point.  

There are extremists on both sides [which can occupy one for hours on youtube] with some riders clearly causing physical and mental distress to the horse. In some instances permanent physical damage to vertebrae and supporting structures can occur and/or long term or permanent psychological damage including a resigned helpless and joyless horse.  On the opposite side of the spectrum, other extremists vehemently state that all horses ridden in a bit are in pain at all times and are being abused.  

Most reasonable horsemen and trainers love and respect horses and appreciate dressage as an art as well as a sport.  They certainly fall between these extremes.  I believe that realistic and fair -minded trainers are aware that at times getting a horse to comply may involve some battles of wills and bodies but we all hope this is as brief a period as possible.  

It is prudent to remember that classical dressage changed very little over the past hundred + years as far as ideals and methods are concerned.  Todays sport horses are bigger, more powerful, athletic and more extreme movers with each generation.  It is tempting to rush these fantastic horses to the FEI levels because they apparently can, but producing a horse that keeps a sound body and mind with joy in his work for his lifetime takes as long as it ever did. When a 'new' technique surfaces, such as extreme hyperflexion, I hope that riders and trainers educate themselves, talk to people they trust and continue to use good judgement in training their horses as individuals.


Dr Lisa Wayman DVM contributor to "Ask a Vet"
-Corman Park Vet Svc
-trainer of  2 Grand Prix horses and mother of 2 young horsewomen

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General | Vaccination | training | hyperflexion

Pregsure

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 12, 2011 08:08

Q:  Dr. Domoslai, Below is a link to an article re 'Pregsure' - similar to some of the drugs in the the Pfizer Gold program that we use. Hope the MLV eliminates this problem. Have you had any cases like this? 
A:  Thanks for the question Peggy.  I looked at all the North American data on MLV vaccines and any cases that might look like those bleeding calves from Pregsure vaccinated cows and could find nothing like that.  I think that Pfizer has been pretty up front with there product lines and would let us know if there was any risk or if similar cases have been seen in North America.  Sounds like an interesting distressing disease and to think that the producers who are trying to protect there cattle and do the right thing inadvertently cause the condition.  Take care. Dr. Domoslai DVS
http://www.producer.com/livestock/article.aspx?aid=41494

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Disease | reaction | Vaccination | cattle

Side Effects of Equine Vaccines

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   October 8, 2011 18:08

Q: My question to you this morning is this. What are the side effects of equine vaccines? I. E.: rabies, west nile & evwt-fr. Thanks

 

Answer by Dr. Lisa Wayman:  Side effects are rare [a few out of hundreds] and the same horses often react each time more than others.   A local inflammatory reaction can occur which is a slightly tender flattened lump at site of injection if present will be there the next day. This subsides in few days with bute or no treatment. Some horses get muscle soreness in whole neck after injection so much that they are too painful to raise and lower head. Those ones should be vaccinated in hind end or get bute at same time. Any injection through non sterile skin can cause an abscess that will show up and enlarge over a week. When mature this abscess is opened and flushed by vet. A very few will have an allergic reaction manifested by shaking, depression or collapse. This happens within 5 min. If a vet gives vaccination injection they will be able to give emergency drugs as soon as it occurs to reverse the allergic shock, but is rare enough than owner vaccination of own horses is not irresponsible. This kind of response can occur with any drug injection not just vaccines.
I like to give vaccines in the soft muscle in front of the shoulder rather than higher up neck. I find far fewer sore swellings at this location.

 

Answer by Dr. Domoslai:  Vaccines have all been extensively tested on numerous horses prior to the release for sale and are extremely safe.  A risk does exist and an occasional horse will have an adverse reaction.  These reactions can vary from mild swelling and pain to death.  An anaphylactic response is the most severe side effect of vaccine and I always have on hand, epinephrine in case the horse has an allergic response.  If your horse has had adverse reactions in the past all booster shots should be risk assessed with your veterinarian before giving them.  There have been many rumours and anecdotal reports of wild side effects basically blaming vaccination on everything from worms to poor behaviour and these reports have to be taken with a grain of salt.  Generally speaking the side effects of vaccine are that the horse gets great immunity to many potentially fatal diseases and you get peace of mind that your horse has protection.