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Dr. Harvey Domoslai, DVM


Corman Park Veterinary Services
5 miles West of Saskatoon, sk
on Highway 14 at Saskatoon Livestock Sales

Full facilities for the management of equine health issues.

Dr. Harvey Domoslai, DVM
Phone: (306) 384-7676
Emergencies: (306) 227-8331

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A Loonie sized stone was removed from this geldings urethra at the end of his penis.

Interesting Cases
Horse Owner Today

Lice!

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 1, 2012 11:11

 


 

 

That time of year everyone, lice.

Lice can be present in cold weather but are not as active as when it begins to warm.

Prime lice target areas are the mane and tailhead.  Look at the base of the hairshaft for nits.  Sucking lice will be attached to the skin.  Chewing or biting lice will be frolicing about.

Treatment is to use one of the ivermectin product for the biting lice.  Crawling lice require a powered product or a spray on product.

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Disease | General | reaction

Cushings Horse Abscessed, is it strangles?

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 13, 2012 20:39

Q:  Need advice: my 29 year old cushings horse has a palm sized abscess on his neck, the vet isn't sure what it is, but speculated that it may be strangles. He took blood today and is doing an ultrasound tomorrow. I was wondering if anyone had experience dealing with this in an older horse, and what I can do to help boost his system.


A:  Cushings horses are quite often immune suppressed and could be why he has the abscess.  Treat the abscess according to your vet’s advice.   Cushings horses can be helped with structured nutrition and meds.  Are you treating his Cushings directly?

Update:  Sounds like you did everything right, just unforunated that he developed the abscess.

Thanks Dr. D.

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Disease | General | reaction

Treatment of Equine Aural Plaques

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 10, 2012 08:10

Q: Dr. Domoslai,   I would like to know if ear aural plaques are contagious to my other two horses?  Do they need to be separated?   Can my horse give them to other horses?  Thank you sir fore your time, hope to hear from you.  Happy Holidays also.  Judy 


A:  Hey Judy thanks for the question.  Aural Plaques are not contagious to other horses.  Horses with a particular sensitivity/allergy to insect bites get aural plaques.  Treatment is always aimed at reducing insect bites on the inside of the ear and treating the plaques with a soothing emollient or ointment.

Dr. Harvey

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Disease | General | reaction

Pregsure

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 12, 2011 08:08

Q:  Dr. Domoslai, Below is a link to an article re 'Pregsure' - similar to some of the drugs in the the Pfizer Gold program that we use. Hope the MLV eliminates this problem. Have you had any cases like this? 
A:  Thanks for the question Peggy.  I looked at all the North American data on MLV vaccines and any cases that might look like those bleeding calves from Pregsure vaccinated cows and could find nothing like that.  I think that Pfizer has been pretty up front with there product lines and would let us know if there was any risk or if similar cases have been seen in North America.  Sounds like an interesting distressing disease and to think that the producers who are trying to protect there cattle and do the right thing inadvertently cause the condition.  Take care. Dr. Domoslai DVS
http://www.producer.com/livestock/article.aspx?aid=41494

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Disease | reaction | Vaccination | cattle

Side Effects of Equine Vaccines

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   October 8, 2011 18:08

Q: My question to you this morning is this. What are the side effects of equine vaccines? I. E.: rabies, west nile & evwt-fr. Thanks

 

Answer by Dr. Lisa Wayman:  Side effects are rare [a few out of hundreds] and the same horses often react each time more than others.   A local inflammatory reaction can occur which is a slightly tender flattened lump at site of injection if present will be there the next day. This subsides in few days with bute or no treatment. Some horses get muscle soreness in whole neck after injection so much that they are too painful to raise and lower head. Those ones should be vaccinated in hind end or get bute at same time. Any injection through non sterile skin can cause an abscess that will show up and enlarge over a week. When mature this abscess is opened and flushed by vet. A very few will have an allergic reaction manifested by shaking, depression or collapse. This happens within 5 min. If a vet gives vaccination injection they will be able to give emergency drugs as soon as it occurs to reverse the allergic shock, but is rare enough than owner vaccination of own horses is not irresponsible. This kind of response can occur with any drug injection not just vaccines.
I like to give vaccines in the soft muscle in front of the shoulder rather than higher up neck. I find far fewer sore swellings at this location.

 

Answer by Dr. Domoslai:  Vaccines have all been extensively tested on numerous horses prior to the release for sale and are extremely safe.  A risk does exist and an occasional horse will have an adverse reaction.  These reactions can vary from mild swelling and pain to death.  An anaphylactic response is the most severe side effect of vaccine and I always have on hand, epinephrine in case the horse has an allergic response.  If your horse has had adverse reactions in the past all booster shots should be risk assessed with your veterinarian before giving them.  There have been many rumours and anecdotal reports of wild side effects basically blaming vaccination on everything from worms to poor behaviour and these reports have to be taken with a grain of salt.  Generally speaking the side effects of vaccine are that the horse gets great immunity to many potentially fatal diseases and you get peace of mind that your horse has protection.