Quick Links

Hay News July 19-25, 2011

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 30, 2011 07:47

 

Saskatchewan livestock producers continue to make good haying progress and now have 73 per cent of the hay crop cut. Fifty one per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

Haying progress varies across the province, ranging from 81 per cent cut in the southwest to 40 per cent cut in the northwest. Seventy-eight per cent of the hay crop is cut in the southeast, 79 per cent in east-central, 76 per cent in west-central and 80 per cent in the northeast.

Sixty-two per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage in the southwest, 57 per cent in east-central, 54 per cent in the northeast, west-central and southeast and 19 per cent in the northwest.

Eighty-six per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality, 13 per cent is rated as fair and one per cent is reported to be in poor condition. Ninety per cent of pasture land is reported to be in good to excellent condition. Ninety-nine per cent of livestock producers have adequate water supplies for their livestock.

Eighty-seven per cent of fall cereals and 75 per cent of spring cereals are reported to be in good to excellent condition. Seventy-two per cent of the oilseeds and 74 per cent of the pulse crops are reported to be in good to excellent condition. The majority of crop damage is due to wind, flooding, disease, insects and hail.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 12 per cent surplus, 81 per cent adequate and seven per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 11 per cent surplus, 79 per cent adequate and 10 per cent short.

Overall, crops are progressing well. While crops are generally still behind in development, the warm weather advanced crops and some producers are contemplating swathing winter crops and early seeded pulses in the next two or three weeks.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting fields and controlling crop diseases and insects. Some farmers are getting harvesting equipment ready.

 

For more information, contact:

Grant McLean
Agriculture
Moose Jaw
Phone: 306-694-3592

Tags:

Hay News July 12-18,2011

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 22, 2011 15:09

Saskatchewan livestock producers made good haying progress over the last week and now have 59 per cent of the hay crop cut. 34 per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture's weekly Crop Report.

Haying progress varies across the province. 73 per cent has been cut in the northeast and east-central, 25 per cent in the northwest, 68 per cent in west-central and the southwest, and 54 per cent in the southeast.

45 per cent of the hay crop has been baled or put into silage in east-central, 7 per cent in the northwest, 37 per cent in the northeast, 41 per cent in west-central, 43 per cent in the southwest and 32 per cent in the southeast.

87 per cent of the hay crop is rated as good to excellent in quality with none reported to be in poor condition.

The average hay yields on dry land are reported as 1.8 tons per acre (alfalfa), 1.9 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome), 1.5 tons per acre (other tame), 1.2 tons per acre (wild) and 2.0 tons per acre (greenfeed). On irrigated land, the average hay yields are 2.6 tons per acre (alfalfa), 2.7 tons per acre (alfalfa/brome), 3.3 tons per acre (other tame), 1.1 tons per acre (wild) and 3.7 tons per acre (greenfeed).

85 per cent of fall cereals and 74 per cent of spring cereals are reported to be in good to excellent condition. 72 per cent of the oilseeds and 80 per cent of the pulse crops are reported to be in good to excellent condition. The majority of crop damage is due to flooding, insects, diseases, wind and hail.

Across the province, topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 9 per cent surplus, 84 per cent adequate and 7 per cent short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 5 per cent surplus, 88 per cent adequate and 7 per cent short.

Farmers are busy haying, scouting crops and controlling diseases and insects. Warm temperatures are helping speed up crop development.

 

 

For more information, contact:

Grant McLean
Agriculture
Moose Jaw
Phone: 306-694-3592

 

Tags:

McErlean Appointed to AHC Board

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 20, 2011 10:43


The American Horse Council is pleased to announce that Mr. Christopher McErlean, President of the Thoroughbred Racing Association (TRA), has been appointed to the AHC Board of Trustees. 

 

Mr. McErlean, Vice President of Racing for Penn National Gaming, Inc. (PNG), was elected President of the TRA in February 2011.

 

TRA has 48 member associations conducting racing at 41 racetracks in the United States and Canada, and PNG currently operates 23 racing and gaming facilities in 16 jurisdictions.  Prior to working at PNG, Mr. McErlean worked at the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority.  He held a number of positions during his fifteen years there, and ultimately held the title of Vice President of Racing Operations for both Monmouth Park and The Meadowlands. 

 

“We are very fortunate that Chris has joined the AHC’s Board of Trustees,” said AHC President Jay Hickey.  “Since the AHC was established in 1969 it has relied on the support of the racing industry.  Chris’s experience will certainly be beneficial to the AHC and its members as we work on the many issues that affect the nation’s horse industry in general and racing in particular.”  

 

“I’ve worked with Jay and the AHC over the years and it is my pleasure to help bring the perspective of the race track operator/business person to the AHC Board.     The TRA has been a strong supporter of AHC over the years and sees great value in its efforts on behalf of all segments of the equine industry.”

 

Mr. McErlean is also a Director of the Thoroughbred Racing Protective Bureau, a Director of the U.S. Trotting Association, a member of Equibase Management Committee, and is Treasurer and former President of Harness Tracks of America.  He holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Economics/Finance from University of Scranton and an MBA in Marketing from Farleigh Dickenson University, and currently lives in Hummelstown, PA with his wife Michele and their two daughters.

 

 Mr. McErlean has replaced Mr. Charles Ruma on the AHC Board.


For more information on the work that the American Horse Council does, please visit their website at www.horsecouncil.org.

 

Link to full article on AHC website

 

Tags:

Cardoza and Guthrie Named New Co-Chairs of the Congressional Horse Caucus

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 15, 2011 09:16

 

Congressmen Dennis Cardoza (D-CA) and Brett Guthrie (R-KY) will be the Co-chairs of the Congressional Horse Caucus in the 112th Congress. 

 

The Congressional Horse Caucus is a bipartisan group of Members of the House of Representatives formed to educate Members of Congress and their staffs about the importance of the horse industry in the economic, agricultural, sporting, gaming and recreational life of the nation.  The Caucus currently has 38 members. Congressmen Ben Chandler (D-KY) and Cliff Stearns (R-FL) were the Co-chairs of the Caucus for the 111th Congress. 

 

“Congressman Chandler and Stearns were great Co-chairmen of the Caucus and we are grateful for all their hard work on behalf of the horse community,” Said AHC President Jay Hickey. “We are happy to have Congressmen Cardoza and Guthrie as the new Co-chairs, they are passionate advocates for the horse industry and we are lucky to have their leadership in the 112th Congress.”    

 

Congressman Dennis Cardoza represents California’s 18th Congressional District. Prior to serving in Congress he spent six years in the California State Assembly and served on the Merced City Council.  Cardoza is a graduate of the University of Maryland. He is married to Dr. Kathleen McLoughlin. They have three children, Joey, Brittany, and Elaina.

 

“The historic equine industry is creating new jobs in rural America, and the Horse Caucus will support those efforts. I look forward to working with Rep. Guthrie to advance and protect this part of our nation’s heritage,” said Congressman Cardoza.

 

Congressman Brett Guthrie represents Kentucky's Second Congressional District. Prior to serving in Congress Guthrie represented the 32nd district in the Kentucky Senate from 1999 to 2008. Guthrie graduated in 1987 from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point   and later earned a Master's Degree from Yale University in Public and Private Management. The Congressman is married to the former Beth Clemmons. They have three children, Caroline, Robby and Elizabeth. 

 

The equine industry is a signature industry of the Bluegrass State and our nation,” said Congressman Guthrie. “The horse industry is an important part of America’s culture and tradition, supports millions of American jobs, and has a great affect on the health of our nation’s economy. 

 

The AHC hopes all members of the horse community will urge their Representatives to join the Congressional Horse Caucus.

 

Link to full article on AHC website

Tags:

Members of Congress Address AHC Issues Forum

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 7, 2011 13:56

 

This year’s American Horse Council National Issues Forum, entitled “Congress on a Diet: What It Means for the Horse Industry,” highlighted the current budget environment in Washington.  The issues forum was part of the AHC annual meeting held from June 19th to the 22nd that also included the annual Congressional Ride-In, AHC committee meetings, and a Congressional Reception.

 

Several Members of Congress spoke to attendees during the issues forum including Congressman Hal Rogers (R-KY), the Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, Congressmen Dennis Cardoza (D-CA) and Brett Guthrie (R-KY), who are the co-chairs of the Congressional Horse Caucus, as well as Congressman John Yarmouth (D-KY). 

 

“The AHC is grateful to have had so many Members of Congress come give us their perspective on the fiscal challenges facing the country. There were several different view points, but the message was clear that when it comes to spending it will not be ‘business as usual’ in Washington,” Said AHC President Jay Hickey. “Without a doubt we will be seeing less federal spending and that could impact the horse industry in many different ways.”

 

The remainder of the issues forum included presentations from several individuals from federal agencies, state health officials and other organizations.  Dr. John Clifford, Deputy Administrator and Chief Veterinary Officer for USDA’s Veterinary Services, and Dr. Guy Hohenhaus, President of the National Assembly of State Animal Health Officials, discussed some of the issues USDA and state veterinarians face in responding to and mitigating equine disease outbreaks under current budgetary constraints. 

 

“Contrasting the current fiscal environment with recent equine disease outbreaks, such as Equine Herpesvirus, further underscores the importance for USDA, state animal health officials and the industry to maintain a strong partnership and collaborate in our continued efforts to safeguard the health of our horses and our industry,” said Dudley Hoskins, AHC Director of Health and Regulator Affairs.

 

“Presentations by Robert Perrin from the Bureau of Land Management and Anne Merwin of the Wilderness Society drove home the point that recreational opportunities on public land could be in danger,” said AHC Legislative Director Ben Pendergrass. “It will be important to fight to preserve adequate funding for public lands, but equestrians are also going to have to explore public/private partnerships with federal, state and local government to keep trails open to equestrians.”    

 

Additionally, attendees received updates on the national equine health initiative, the activities of the Unwanted Horse Coalition, the status of the national animal identification system, the Americas Great Outdoors Initiative and a discussion about how the horse industry can improve its political activities with a focus on the 2012 elections.

 

“I believe we had a very informative National Issues Forum this year,” said Hickey. “We brought together Members of Congress, key federal agency officials, and leaders in the horse industry and everyone came away with a better understanding of the challenges we face in the coming years.”     

 

Link to full article on AHC website

 

Tags:

AHC's 2011 Van Ness Award Presented to Idaho Horse Industry's Edith Stanger

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 7, 2011 09:02


 

Each year the American Horse Council awards the Van Ness Award to a person that embodies the dedication and service of the late Mrs. Marjorie Van Ness, one of the founders of the New Jersey Horse Council.

 

The American Horse Council is pleased to announce that it has awarded its 2011 Van Ness Award to Edith Stanger of Idaho Falls, ID. 

 

In presenting the award, AHC president Jay Hickey noted that, “Mrs. Stanger has given her time continuously to the promotion of all aspects of the horse industry.  She was instrumental in founding the Idaho State Horse Council in 1975, where she continues to contribute to this day - almost forty years later!  Mrs. Stanger recognized the need for a united voice for all horse interests, and was instrumental in joining the AHC as one of the earliest State Horse Council members.” 

 

Together with husband, Dick, Edith Stanger created the Double Arrow Ranch, the largest registered herd of Appaloosa horses in the world.  She has served on the Board of Directors for the Appaloosa Horse Club, as President of the Intermountain Appaloosa Club, and as Secretary of the Snake River Valley Horse Show.

 

“Edith has also worked for the entire industry,” said Hickey.  “She helped get legislation promoted to aid the racing industry; to get the brand inspection check-off fee dedicated to the Idaho Horse Board which awards grants to horse activities that meet the strict criteria of use for research, promotion, or education; and recently got a bill through the Idaho legislature allowing simulcast lease holders to move off-site.” 

 

“Thank all of you who are supporters of the Council, and thank you for this great honor you have bestowed upon me,” Mrs. Stanger said in accepting the award.  “And thank you to the past, present and future generations that love the horse, are truly concerned for its welfare, and are active in its treatment,” she added.

 

The horse community in Idaho has benefited greatly from the loyalty and dedication of Mrs. Edith Stanger.  She has won many awards for her service to the horse industry, has been elected to the National Appaloosa Horse Club’s Hall of Fame, the Idaho Horse Council’s Hall of Fame, the Idaho Horsemen’s Hall of Fame, and has been deemed a living legend in her community.  “She can now add the Van Ness Award to that long list of accomplishments,” said Hickey.

 

For more information on how to nominate someone for the 2012 Van Ness Award please contact Ashley Cole at acole@horsecouncil.org.

 

Link to full article on AHC website

 

Tags: