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1099 Reporting Repeal Amendment Passes

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   February 4, 2011 14:26

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 4, 2011

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Contact: Bridget Harrison

202-296-4031

bharrison@horsecouncil.org

 

This week the Senate approved an amendment to the FAA Air Transportation Modernization and Safety Improvement Act that will repeal the recent 1099 paperwork mandate.  The amendment was offered by Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI).

 

The 1099 paperwork mandate was a provision of the health care bill passed last year that imposes new tax reporting requirements, on every business in the U.S., including those in the horse industry, beginning in 2012. 

 

There were several attempts to repeal the 1099 requirement last Congress which failed.

 

“We are glad the Senate has taken this step towards repeal of the new 1099 requirement,” said AHC president Jay Hickey. “There is wide agreement that this is a burdensome requirement for businesses. However, during the last Congress disagreement over details got in the way of repeal. We hope the overwhelming support of this amendment is proof that everyone is now on the same page.”

 

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Health Care Bill”) that was signed into law last year included a provision broadly-expanding 1099 IRS form reporting requirements starting in 2012.  Currently the law requires 1099s to be sent to any independent contractor that receives $600 or more from a business in a year.  The new requirement requires 1099s be sent not only to independent contractors but also to any individual or corporation from whom a business purchases a total of $600 or more in goods or services in any given year.  Its stated purpose is to identify unreported taxable income, fraudulent tax deductions, and increase tax compliance.

 

This new requirement will greatly increase the administrative burden on all businesses, particularly small businesses, including those in the horse industry.  For example if a horse farm buys $600 worth of hay and grain from a particular retailer, or purchases buckets and bridles for a total of $600 from a tack shop, or an even buys office supplies of $600 from a supply store over the course of the year, or an individual buys a computer for $700 from a local store, they are required to issue each business a 1099 form that must be completed and returned to the IRS.  This reporting mandate places an added burden on each business involved.  The horse businesses would have to collect information and tax identification numbers for every entity they do $600 worth of business with and mail them forms and the business receiving the forms must complete them.

 

The Stabenow amendment repeals only the new reporting requirements.  Businesses would still have to send 1099s to independent contractors.

 

The Senate must now approve the FAA Air Transportation Modernization and Safety Improvement Act which will then be considered by the House. Repeal of the 1099 provision has broad bipartisan support. But the larger bill may or may not pass both the Senate and the House. Therefore, repeal at this juncture is not assured.

 

Senator Mike Johanns (R-NE), Senator Max Baucus (D-MT), Congressman Dan Lungren (R-CA), and Congressmen Steve Scalise (R-LA), have each introduced stand alone bills that would also repeal the 1099 provision. 

 

“The AHC will continue to work in support of repealing the new 1099 paperwork mandate,” said Hickey. “Repealing the 1099 mandate has broad bipartisan support and we are very optimistic that a fix will be in place before the new requirement goes into effect in 2012.” 

 

Link to This Article on AHC’s Website

 

 

 

As the national association representing all segments of the horse industry in Washington, D.C., the American Horse Council works daily to represent equine interests and opportunities. The AHC promotes and protects the industry by communicating with Congress, federal agencies, the media and the industry on behalf of all horse related interests each and every day.                       

The AHC is member supported by individuals and organizations representing virtually every facet of the horse world from owners, breeders, veterinarians, farriers, breed registries and horsemen's associations to horse shows, race tracks, rodeos, commercial suppliers and state horse councils.

 

 

 

 

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University of Saskatchewan names horse health centre after Saskatoon philanthropists

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 18, 2011 14:11

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 18, 2011

 

 

Saskatoon, Sask. --- An expanded facility for horse health at the University of Saskatchewan will be called the Ryan/Dubé Equine Performance Centre in recognition of a Saskatoon couple’s longtime support for veterinary research and education.

 

Heather Ryan and her husband, L. David Dubé, contributed $1.2 million toward the expansion of the college's existing equine performance centre. The Government of Saskatchewan, Marg and Ron Southern of Calgary, Alta., and the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) provided the rest of the funding for the $2.8-million project.

 

Construction will begin in February 2011. The project will add nearly 1,000 sq m (10,600 sq. ft.) as well as vital resources to the WCVM’s equine education, clinical and research programs. “This expansion will give our students, faculty and staff the tools and indoor space that they need to enhance horse health care in Western Canada,” says WCVM Dean Douglas Freeman.

           

“In particular, this building will be a focal point for diagnosing, treating and investigating different lameness issues. Through those activities, it will also be a place where our veterinary students can learn more about how to recognize and accurately diagnose the causes of lameness in horses, and provide their future clients with the best treatment options.”

 

Built in 1998, the original facility includes a high-speed treadmill and a computerized force plate system — two invaluable tools for detecting and diagnosing equine lamenesses. The centre’s new features will include:

 

·       a paved indoor runway that will allow clinicians and students to conduct examinations on a smooth, even surface — 365 days of the year. Besides its diagnostic value, the runway will be used for teaching demonstrations and lameness-oriented research.

·       a permanent longeing arena that’s critical for the accurate diagnosis and detection of many subtle unilateral or bilateral lameness issues in horses. The arena will also become a focal point for horse handling labs, teaching demonstrations and continuing veterinary education seminars. 

·       a multi-purpose area with two semi-permanent restraint stocks that will provide a safe, secure place for faculty and students to undertake physical examinations and various technical procedures that are performed daily by equine clinicians.

Ryan and Dubé’s previous contributions to the veterinary college include a $1.07-million gift to the College’s equine and companion animal health programs. They also created a matching gift incentive program in 2006 that has helped to raise more than $450,000 for equine health research at the WCVM in the past four years. 

 

Located on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon, Sask., the WCVM is a Canadian centre of veterinary education, expertise and research with nearly 450 students enrolled in veterinary and graduate degree programs. The college’s Equine Health Research Fund annually invests nearly $200,000 in equine health research grants, equine fellowships and a summer equine research program for undergraduate veterinary students at the WCVM.

 

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For more information, please contact:

Myrna MacDonald, Communications

Western College of Veterinary Medicine

University of Saskatchewan

Tel: 306-225-4479 • Cell: 306-291-9950

sm.ridley@sasktel.net

 

 

 

 

 

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Control Split as 112th Congress Convenes

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 14, 2011 14:07

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 14, 2011

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Contact: Bridget Harrison

202-296-4031

bharrison@horsecouncil.org

 

 

           

 

 

 

The 112th Congress convened in early January facing many of the same issues left over from the last Congress.  But they may remain on the table as the emphasis in this Congress will be on cutting government programs and spending, reducing the deficit and debt, and spurring job growth.  The House of Representatives has shifted to Republican control.  Democrats still control the Senate, but the majority is smaller.  More than 100 new members have taken their seats in the House and Senate, nearly a 20% turnover.

“Issues important to the horse industry will be on the table.  Comprehensive immigration reform, internet wagering, tax reform, animal welfare, trails legislation, equine health, and the farm bill are important to the equine community,” noted Jay Hickey, president of the American Horse Council, which represents the horse industry in Washington.  “Overriding all debate, however, is how existing programs can be paid for and whether new programs can be initiated in a Congress that will be focused on reducing spending and the size of government.” 

Under new House rules any federal program, whether existing or new, involving spending increases must be offset by cuts of an equal amount in another program.  The program cannot be funded by tax increases.  “In addition, Congress will be looking for ways to raise much-needed revenue.  The horse industry must be vigilant to ensure that such revenue is not raised unfairly at its expense,” Hickey said.

    

In what’s been called a “wave” election by many, and a “shellacking” by President Obama, the Republicans gained control of the House in the November elections, picking up 63 seats.  96 new members are in the House freshman class, only 9 of whom are Democrats.  The ratio is 242 Republicans and 193 Democrats.   

 

In the Senate, Republicans gained 7 seats, leaving the Democrats in control, but with less of a cushion.  The Senate now includes 53 Democrats and 47 Republicans, with 16 new Members.  Neither party is close enough to the 60 votes needed to stop a filibuster under Senate procedures and force through controversial legislation; but the Senate is considering revising the filibuster rules and that may make it easier to get bills to the floor.

 

There are new leaders in the House.  John Boehner (R-OH) has been elected Speaker of the House.  Eric Cantor (R-VA) is the new Majority Leader.  Former Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is now the Minority Leader and Steny Hoyer (D-MD) the Minority Whip.  Senator Harry Reid (D-NV) will remain as Senate Majority Leader and Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY) remains Minority Leader. 

  

With the Republican takeover of the House, the chairmanships of all the House Committees have passed to Republicans from Democrats.  The makeup of the House Committees has also changed with Republicans having many more seats on each committee.  This will make it easier for Republicans to pass legislation in the House.  But the Senate is still controlled by Democrats and getting some House bills through the Senate will still be difficult.  Then there is always the final backstop of a Presidential veto.  So there’s no clear sailing for Republicans.  While Republicans have made strong gains, bi-partisanship and compromise will be necessary to get any bills actually passed into law. 

 

A fundamental question to be answered by the new Congress is whether the bi-partisan cooperation exhibited in the recently-concluded lame-duck session of the last Congress will hold for the new Congress.  That lame-duck session saw the extension of the Bush-era tax cuts, the reinstatement of the estate tax, the extension of unemployment benefits, the ratification of the nuclear arms treaty with Russia, and the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”  But there is precedent for cooperation and compromise when each party controls one chamber.  That split control has seemed to clarify the need to work together if anything is to get done.

 

“Like most industries, the horse industry’s legislative concerns don’t break along partisan lines.  The industry must work on a bi-partisan basis with Members of Congress from both sides of the aisle,” said Hickey.  “The AHC and the horse industry have been working with Congress for four decades.  This is a new Congress with more than 100 new members.  The AHC has already called on its Congressional Cavalry to welcome both the new and returning Members of Congress and to explain the importance of the horse industry to the nation’s agricultural, economic, sporting and recreational life.” 

 

“The horse industry has a $112 billion affect on the economy and support 1.5 million jobs.  Every state has a horse industry.  Forty-five states have more than 20,000 horses.  The equine community must continue to ensure that the 112th Congress recognizes that,” said Hickey.

 

Link to This Article on AHC’s Website

 

 

 

As the national association representing all segments of the horse industry in Washington, D.C., the American Horse Council works daily to represent equine interests and opportunities. The AHC promotes and protects the industry by communicating with Congress, federal agencies, the media and the industry on behalf of all horse related interests each and every day.                       

The AHC is member supported by individuals and organizations representing virtually every facet of the horse world from owners, breeders, veterinarians, farriers, breed registries and horsemen's associations to horse shows, race tracks, rodeos, commercial suppliers and state horse councils.

 

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Reining Canada would like to announce an offer of Insurance to our Members and the Regional Affiliates.

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 3, 2011 09:05

 

 

 

 

P.O. Box 11 Site 7 RR 1

Cochrane, Alberta T4C 1A1

 Reining Canada would like to announce an offer of Insurance to our Members and the Regional Affiliates.

Reining Canada recognizes that many members are without insurance and many affiliates would like the opportunity to improve their insurance or would like to look at other insurance options.

Commercial General Liability Insurance Program for Reining Canada and its Affiliate Associations

Object of Insurance:

Comprehensive general liability covering Reining Canada’s and its Affiliate

Associations’ legal liabilities to third parties for death, disease, bodily injury,

personal injury and/or loss, damage or loss of use of property. Coverage applies

to the operations of Reining Canada and its Affiliates and during activities hosted

by or sanctioned by Reining Canada or one of its Affiliates.

Limits of Insurance:

$5,000,000 Commercial General Liability

$1,000,000 SPF No. 6 Non-Owned Automobile

$ 50,000 SEF No. 94 Legal Liability for Damage to Non-Owned Automobiles

$ 250,000 Contingent Employers’ Liability

$ 10,000 Property of Every Description, option to purchase higher limits

$ 10,000 Agreement I Employee Dishonesty – Form A

$ 5,000 Agreement II Loss Inside the Premises

$ 5,000 Agreement III Loss Outside the Premises

$ 5,000 Agreement IV Money Orders and Counterfeit Paper Currency

$ 10,000 Agreement V Depositor’s Forgery

$ 10,000 Agreement VI Computer Fraud

Deductible

$1,000 per occurrence (including expenses) applies to all losses except

$Nil applies to SPF No. 6 Non-Owned Automobile

$500 applies to SEF No. 96 Legal Liability for Damage to Hired Autos

$Nil applies to Medical Payments

$500 applies to Crime (Agreements I through VI)

Extension of coverage

 

Personal and Advertising injury liability

Directors’ and Officers’ Liability Insurance Program for Reining Canada and its Affiliate Associations

Object of insurance

Non-Profit Management and Corporate Liability insurance covering Reining

Canada’s and its Affiliate Associations. Coverage protects the assets of

Directors and Officers of Reining Canada and its Affiliates while they are acting

in their capacities as Directors and Officers. Insured Wrongful Acts include an

actual or alleged negligent act, error, omission, misstatement or misleading

statement. Coverage is not provided for bodily injury or property damage claims.

Limits of insurance

$ 2,000,000 limit per Wrongful Act

$10,000,000 Program Aggregate

Deductible

(A): $0.00 each Claim for all Non-Indemnified Loss

(B): $2,000.00 each Claim for all Indemnified Loss

(C): $2,000.00 each Employment Practices Wrongful Act Claim

Extension of coverage

Employment Practices Liability

Personal Liability Insurance Program for Individual Members of Reining

Canada (through its Affiliate Associations)

Object of insurance

Personal liability coverage for ownership of horses covering members’ legal

liabilities to third parties for death, disease, bodily injury, personal injury and/or

loss, damage or loss of use of property. Coverage applies 24 hours a day, 7

days a week, provided there is no commercial use of the member’s horse(s).

Limits of insurance

$5,000,000 Liability for ownership of horses including:

$1,000,000 Non-Owned Automobile

$50,000 Legal Liability for Damage to Non-Owned Automobiles

Deductible

$1,000 per occurrence (including expenses) applies to all losses except

$Nil applies to SPF No. 6 Non-Owned Automobile

$500 applies to SEF No. 96 Legal Liability for Damage to Hired Autos

$Nil applies to Medical Payments

Bodily Injury and Property Damage

To view remainder of this article go to:   http://www.reiningcanada.com/pdf/2011_Insurance_Proposal.pdf

 

 

 

 

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A NEW CANADIAN HORSE ALLIANCE IS FORMED

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   December 31, 2010 08:28

 

A N N O U N C E M E N T

A NEW CANADIAN HORSE ALLIANCE IS FORMED

MONTREAL, Nov. 19 /CNW Telbec/ - The provincial equestrian organizations of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Quebec, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland & Labrador are proud to announce the incorporation of a new national alliance of equine organizations under the provisions of the Canada Corporations Act. The name of the new organization is pending approval of Industry Canada and a further announcement is forthcoming.

The Alberta Equestrian Federation, the Saskatchewan Horse Federation, Fédération équestre du Québec, Nova Scotia Equestrian Federation, the Newfoundland Equestrian Association, and the Island Horse Council, have been working together for more than a year to explore ways to promote and protect the interests of their members and of horse enthusiasts everywhere.

The six founding member organizations of the new alliance have for many years been leaders in the delivery of local programs and services to the equine sector, and have been supported by growing individual memberships reflecting the diversity of the equine community from coast to coast.

The six organizations represent more than 30,000 Canadians. It will be the mission of the alliance to harness the collective assets of member organizations to develop, strengthen and promote horse-related initiatives that respect this diversity. In particular, the alliance aims to invest in sport, recreation and industry development at the local and grass-roots level, assisting traditionally under-represented or under-served horse people and organizations to achieve mutually-identified goals. One of its first initiatives will be the introduction of a true Canadian Championships event. The overriding aim of the alliance will be to protect and promote the horse and horse welfare, whether in sport, agriculture, or as a family companion.

In its first year of business, the alliance will be communicating its aims and objectives widely, in the hope that horse people and organizations will join with it to build a national organization that is a clear reflection of the diversity and richness of horse life in Canada. The six founding members recently met in Alberta to formulate their priority objectives for 2011, and once its corporate name is approved a more detailed announcement will be published. At its first meeting, a board of directors consisting of the six presidents of the founding members was established, and Dixie Crowson of Vauxhall, Alberta will serve as its first President.

For further information:

Claire Milton, Media Representative at 902-523-1937

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www.HorseOwnerToday.com invites all horse rescues!

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   December 21, 2010 20:46

www.HorseOwnerToday.com invites all horse rescues to join our new verified vendor section "Horse Rescues".

Submit your rescue information via facebook or through out "contact us" button in the lower header.  www.HorseOwnerToday.com will create an advertisement for your horse rescue, at no charge (you have to be non-profit/charitable). 

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Feel the Food by Dreens

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   December 20, 2010 22:44

www.HorseOwnerToday.com is pleased to bring an exciting food segment to our readers.  Dreen of Dreen's Catering will be guiding you to "Feel the Food!"  The first segment will be here shortly.

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Lunar Eclipse

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   December 20, 2010 22:35

Early in the morning on December 21 a total lunar eclipse will be visible to sky watchers across North America (for observers in western states the eclipse actually begins late in the evening of December 20), Greenland and Iceland. Viewers in Western Europe will be able to see the beginning stages of the eclipse before moonset, and in western Asia the later stages of the eclipse will be visible after moonrise.

From beginning to end, the eclipse will last about three hours and twenty-eight minutes. For observers on the east coast of the U.S. the eclipse lasts from 1:33am EST through 5:01 a.m. EST. Viewers on the west coast will be able to tune in a bit earlier. For them the eclipse begins at 10:33 p.m. PST on December 20 and lasts until 2:01am PST on Dec. 21. Totality, the time when Earth's shadow completely covers the moon, will last a lengthy 72 minutes.  see more at http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/eclipse/index.html

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Scramento California American Powerlifting Meet November 27, 2010

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   December 15, 2010 08:05

The Mackie Family centered out of Mackie Physiotherapy Strength Training Facility trained for 4 months to compete in a Power lifting meet out of a gym called Bodytribe in Sacramento California.  This was one of the first events in which an entire family competed in individual categories.  Luke Mackie 8 yrs old secured 3 world records; squat 105 lbs, bench press 65 lbs and deadlift 145 lbs.  Cayley Mackie 13 yrs old was competing with a pulled hamstring(suffered from activities outside of powerlifting), squat 130 lbs, bench 105 lbs, deadlift 125lbs, Jordyn Mackie 15yrs old completed a squat of 170lbs , bench of 95 lbs and a deadlift of 215lbs which guaranteed 3 world records.  D’Arcy Mackie (MOM) competed strong in the masters division and achieved a squat of 160lbs, bench of 90 lbs and a deadlift of 205 lbs, Blaine finished off in the masters division with a squat of 415 but did not get low enough for the squat to count and then benched 300lbs and deadlifted 455 lbs.  All were proud to bring home trophies from each division and overall met many new friends and had a great time.  We will be gearing up to start our next strength cycle to enter another competition in 2011.

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Report Your 2010 Access Issues on Federal Land

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   December 15, 2010 07:00

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

December 14, 2010

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Contact: Bridget Harrison

202-296-4031

bharrison@horsecouncil.org

 

                                                                                              Report Your 2010 Access Issues on Federal Land

 

The American Horse Council is continuing its effort to collect information on access issues equestrians are experiencing on federal lands. The center piece of this effort is an online form equestrians can use to report their personal experiences regarding trails that have been closed to them or other access issues on federal land. This online form is located at https://www.horsecouncil.org/survey.php.

 Shortly, the AHC will be publishing a 2010 Report on Equestrian Access on Federal Land.  “It is vital that all equestrians report their experiences on federal land good and bad,” said AHC Legislative Director Ben Pendergrass. “Equestrians need to relay their 2010 experiences to us by the end of the year so we can include them in the 2010 report. This information is vital to AHC efforts to protect equestrian recreation on federal land.”

 Last February, the American Horse Council released its first Report on Equestrian Access on Federal Land. The 2009 report provided a brief overview of the responses the AHC received from equestrians to its ongoing access survey in 2009.  The report can be viewed and downloaded on the Recreation Issues page on the AHC website or by clicking here.

 The American Horse Council began its effort to collect information regarding equestrian access issues on federal lands in July of 2009.   This effort was prompted by a growing concern among recreational riders around the country that they were seeing a reduction in the number of trails and trail heads open to equestrians on federal land.

 “Hundreds of thousands of Americans use horses and pack stock to enjoy America’s great outdoors each year.  However, it is an experience that cannot be enjoyed without access to public land, trail systems, and trailheads,” said Pendergrass. 

 “The AHC uses the survey and the year end report to illustrate some of the challenges facing recreational riders,” said AHC President Jay Hickey.” “Our federal land mangers work hard to provide recreational opportunities and we need to make sure they have adequate information about what some equestrians are experiencing.   The annual Report on Equestrian Access on Federal Land is just one part of our efforts to ensure equestrians continue to have recreational opportunities on federal land. “

 The AHC asks all recreational riders now and in the future to visit the AHC website and report any access issues they have had using this electronic form.

 Link to This Article on AHC’s Website

 

 

 

As the national association representing all segments of the horse industry in Washington, D.C., the American Horse Council works daily to represent equine interests and opportunities. The AHC promotes and protects the industry by communicating with Congress, federal agencies, the media and the industry on behalf of all horse related interests each and every day.                       

The AHC is member supported by individuals and organizations representing virtually every facet of the horse world from owners, breeders, veterinarians, farriers, breed registries and horsemen's associations to horse shows, race tracks, rodeos, commercial suppliers and state horse councils.

 

 

 

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