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UHC Seeks to Expand National Speaker Program

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   December 15, 2010 06:44

IMMEDIATE RELEASE                

   December 14,2010

                    

 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Ericka Caslin, Director

Unwanted Horse Coalition

202-296-4031

ecaslin@horsecouncil.org

 UHC Seeks to Expand National Speaker Program

WASHINGTON, D.C. – December 14, 2010 The Unwanted Horse Coalition’s (UHC) National Speaker Program has been up and running since early 2009 with approximately 100 speakers in the database. This program provides equine events around the country with UHC volunteers to speak about the issue of unwanted horses and what it means to “Own Responsibly”. The UHC is looking to expand its National Speaker Program by adding additional speakers and additional events to the schedule.

 The UHC will provide literature to hand out at the event, as well as a power point presentation about the coalition and the unwanted horse issue. Speakers will be matched to events based on location.

 “We encourage organizations to take advantage of this opportunity to spread the word about the issues surrounding unwanted horses and the work of the UHC,” said Ericka Caslin, Director of the UHC.

 If you have an equine related event coming up, please contact the UHC to request a speaker. It has become increasingly important to educate the equine industry about the issues at hand and ways to get involved.

 If you are interested in requesting a speaker for your upcoming event or are willing to represent the UHC as a speaker please contact the Unwanted Horse Coalition at 202-296-4031 or contactus@unwantedhorsecoalition.org. The UHC will do its best to accommodate all events.

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The Unwanted Horse Coalition

The mission of the Unwanted Horse Coalition is to reduce the number of unwanted horses and improve their welfare through education and the efforts of organizations committed to the health, safety and responsible care and disposition of these horses. The UHC grew out of the Unwanted Horse Summit, which was organized by the American Association of Equine Practitioners and held in conjunction with the American Horse Council’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C., in April 2005. The summit was held to bring key stakeholders together to start a dialogue on the unwanted horse in America. Its purpose was to develop consensus on the most effective way to work together to address the issue. In June 2006, the UHC was folded into the AHC and now operates under its auspices.

 

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Santa and his new ride at Redline Harley-Davidson Saskatoon

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 30, 2010 14:46

photo by Michael Martin

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Santa and his helpers at Redline Harley-Davidson, Saskatoon

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 30, 2010 14:44

photo by Michael Martin

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Santa at Redline Harley-Davidson in Saskatoon

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 30, 2010 09:10

photo by Michael Martin

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Santa Claus at Redline Harley-Davidson in Saskatoon

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 27, 2010 16:18

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Codie Prevost update!

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 5, 2010 14:47

Congratulations to Emily Lewis on winning the VIP Package! You have backstage passes for you & a guest to the Codie Prevost/High Valley show at the Orr Centre in Regina, Sk tomorrow. Thanks to everyone who entered the contest

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Congratulations Codie Prevost

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 4, 2010 10:45

Codie Prevost Pretty excited just found out my album "Get Loud" was on the top 50 sellers this week in Canada on the Nielsen Charts!

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Equine Care Facilities: Helping Our Nation’s Unwanted Horses

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 3, 2010 14:52

                                    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                

   

                                 November 2, 2010

 

 

                                    FOR MORE INFORMATION

                                    Ericka Caslin, Director

                                    Unwanted Horse Coalition

                                    202-296-4031

                                    ecaslin@horsecouncil.org

 

 Equine Care Facilities: Helping Our Nation’s Unwanted Horses

 WASHINGTON, DC – November 2, 2010 - A good deal of research has been done in the past few years about the importance of equine care facilities within the equine industry. With the number of unwanted horses currently estimated at 100,000 per year, increasing the ability of current facilities to care for horses and starting additional facilities will help to alleviate the burden.

 The Unwanted Horse Coalition’s 2009 Unwanted Horses Survey, with 2,245 participants representing equine care facilities out of a total of more than 27,000 respondents, found that many of our nation’s rescues are at or near capacity and must turn many horses away. The survey found that 39% of facilities have reached their maximum capacity, 30% are at 75% - 99% capacity, and 26% are at 50% - 74% capacity. Rescue/adoption/rehabilitation facilities reported turning away 38% of the horses that are brought to them. One of the most appealing solutions cited by the 27,000 respondents is to increase the ability of private care facilities to care for unwanted horses.

 A recent survey conducted by experts at the University of California, Davis, estimated that there are 326 registered non-profit equine rescue facilities in the U.S. The maximum capacity of these rescues is approximately 13,400, well below the estimation of 100,000 unwanted horses in the U.S. every year.

 Because of the number of unwanted horses and the limited capacity of our nation’s current equine care facilities, it is extremely important to increase the ability of our current facilities to gain more funding, adopt out more horses, and care for additional horses. Creating new rescue/adoption/rehabilitation facilities to help take in more unwanted horses will also help alleviate the issue of unwanted horses the equine industry is facing. Whether it be a currently operating facility or an up and coming new facility, it is vital that these facilities have the tools and the means to run a well-established, long-term business. The more our equine care facilities are informed about issues such as volunteer management, fundraising mechanisms, database management, and non-profit status the more horses will be given a second chance at a new career.

 Many facilities and individuals have noted the importance of starting new facilities to care for unwanted horses. Days End Farm Horse Rescue, located in Lisbon, Maryland, has created a manual that will help guide those who wish to start their own equine care facility. Guidelines for Establishing a Non-Profit Horse Rescue Facility was created to inform individuals interested in starting a horse rescue about the expense and the time involved in such an endeavor, and to provide additional useful information collected over the years by an established rescue facility. Kathy Howe, president of Days End Farm Horse Rescue, said, “A horse rescue facility is foremost a business and needs to be run like a business. The horses’ lives are in your hands. Love the horses with your heart but protect the horses with your mind!”

 Jennifer Williams of Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society also published a book about the proper way to start and run a horse rescue facility. Williams stated, “The number of rescues in the country increases almost daily yet many people who decide to run a rescue organization have never been involved with non-profits. Although they have the heart to dedicate to the cause, they often do not know how to put together a rescue or how to run the organization once it is set up. Because of this, many rescuers get overwhelmed and close their doors. This book is designed to help assist those who are trying to start a rescue and to provide advice for the long-term management of their organization.” The book, How to Start and Run a Rescue, gives an insight into how established rescue organizations operate, and also how one can get involved in volunteering or assisting rescues.

 Although the equine care facilities take on much of the brunt and the burden of the nation’s unwanted horse population, all equine organizations must be involved at some level to help solve the problem. The Unwanted Horse Coalition (UHC) published a handbook entitled Best Practices: How Your Organization Can Help Unwanted Horses, which details the efforts, initiatives and activities organizations can undertake to help reduce the number of unwanted horses. It is important that breed organizations assess the number of unwanted horses produced within their breed and, in turn, implement programs that will help give horses a chance at adoption and/or rehabilitation.

 The National Thoroughbred Racing Association has created a ‘Safety and Integrity Alliance, which has a large focus on aftercare for retired racehorses. Because of this program, many racetracks around the country are developing on-track adoption programs to assist racehorses in finding new homes and second careers. The Jockey Club created the Retirement Checkoff Program, which enables owners to make donations at the time of registration that benefit the Thoroughbred Charities of America and the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation. The Jockey Club also provides tattoo research free of charge through its Tattoo Identification Services. With tattoo information, more Thoroughbreds can be identified, which helps in the planning for the horses’ welfare.

 The American Quarter Horse Association has developed a program entitled Full Circle Program. This program enables Quarter Horse owners and breeders to enroll their horses at no cost to ensure that these horses, even if sold, will never become unwanted. The United States Trotting Association has also implemented a program to help assist their Standardbred horses in need. The Support Our Standardbreds program is designed to provide financial aid for the care of abused or neglected Standardbred horses.

 For more information on how your organization can get involved in the effort to help unwanted horses, please contact UHC Director Ericka Caslin at ecaslin@horsecouncil.org or 202-296-4031.

 The Unwanted Horse Coalition

The mission of the Unwanted Horse Coalition is to reduce the number of unwanted horses and improve their welfare through education and the efforts of organizations committed to the health, safety and responsible care and disposition of these horses. The UHC grew out of the Unwanted Horse Summit, which was organized by the American Association of Equine Practitioners and held in conjunction with the American Horse Council’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C., in April 2005. The summit was held to bring key stakeholders together to start a dialogue on the unwanted horse in America. Its purpose was to develop consensus on the most effective way to work together to address the issue. In June 2006, the UHC was folded into the AHC and now operates under its auspices.

 

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Unwanted Horse Coalition’s Operation Gelding Clinics Taking Place Across the U.S.

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   October 28, 2010 16:29

                                

                                            FOR MORE INFORMATION

                                    Ericka Caslin, Director

                                    Unwanted Horse Coalition

                                    202-296-4031

                                    ecaslin@horsecouncil.org

 WASHINGTON, DC – October 28, 2010 - The Unwanted Horse Coalition’s (UHC) Operation Gelding program is off to a successful start. The program, which was launched in August 2010 with the help of seed money from the American Association of Equine Practitioners Foundation and the UHC, is designed to offer funding assistance to organizations, associations, and events that wish to conduct a public gelding clinic under the name and guidelines of Operation Gelding. An organization that has completed an Operation Gelding clinic will receive funding of $50 per horse, $1,000 maximum, to aid in the costs associated with the clinic.

 

Numerous groups have contacted the UHC with interest in organizing an Operation Gelding clinic. Currently there are 14 Operation Gelding clinics on the schedule to be held across the country before the end of 2010, with locations including Colorado, Ohio, Texas, Georgia, and Kansas. With three Operation Gelding clinics already completed, the UHC and the AAEP have helped aid in the castration of approximately 30 horses.

 Alison Lacarrubba, of the University of Missouri Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, organized an Operation Gelding clinic in which the University’s veterinary students were able to perform castrations while under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian. Through the Operation Gelding program, the students were able to castrate 11 horses to help further their education all while assisting horses and horse owners in need. “The clinic went great! From my perspective, it was a success on all fronts. We castrated 11 horses, the horse owners were happy, and the students were super excited to be able to participate,” said Lacarrubba of the October 2 clinic.

 On October 4 an Operation Gelding clinic, held by Dr. Mark Korb and the Barnesville Animal Clinic of Barnesville, Georgia, was able to help geld 12 stallions. The clinic was so successful and well received that the organization has expressed interest in conducting another clinic in the spring. “I think we castrated several horses that probably would have never been castrated due to financial reasons,” said Korb.

 Four Corners Equine Rescue of Aztec, New Mexico, completed a successful Operation Gelding clinic on October 16. Seven horses were castrated with the help of the program.

 Dr. Douglas Corey, UHC president, said, “I am excited about the success of the UHC’s Operation Gelding program and that it is already so widely accepted and used. The UHC wanted to further its mission of educating the horse industry, and by creating action-oriented programs such as Operation Gelding, we can be more hands on within the community.”

 For more information on Operation Gelding, how to conduct a clinic, or the schedule of Operation Gelding clinics, please contact Ericka Caslin, UHC director, at ecaslin@horsecouncil.org or 202-296-4031.

 

 

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The Unwanted Horse Coalition

The mission of the Unwanted Horse Coalition is to reduce the number of unwanted horses and improve their welfare through education and the efforts of organizations committed to the health, safety and responsible care and disposition of these horses. The UHC grew out of the Unwanted Horse Summit, which was organized by the American Association of Equine Practitioners and held in conjunction with the American Horse Council’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C., in April 2005. The summit was held to bring key stakeholders together to start a dialogue on the unwanted horse in America. Its purpose was to develop consensus on the most effective way to work together to address the issue. In June 2006, the UHC was folded into the AHC and now operates under its auspices.

 Bridget Harrison <bharrison@horsecouncil.org> 

 

 

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"Taking the Lead" by Sheila Robertson

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   October 28, 2010 15:36

In an extensive and frank exploration, leaders in women's coaching discuss the values women bring to the coaching profession; their quest for equal access; ways career aspirations and motherhood are juggled; how to negotiate contracts; and encounters with homophobia, harassment, and bullying.  They also identify the challenges to progress and highlight the essential changes that need to be made.

 

 

Taking the Lead will be of interest to sports organizations; leaders and educators; athletes and parents; researchers in sport and gender studies; and politicians and policy makers.

Women in leadership roles in business,  public service, education, and their communities willl find the wisdom contained in Taking the Lead readily transferrable to their respective arenas.

                                 "We hope that the readers of this book will be inspired by the personal stories, disturbed by the realities,

                                  encouraged by the recommendations, and challenged to join in addressing and correcting the issues."

                                                 -Sheila Robertson, From the Preface

 

Sheila Robertson has been an award-winning writer and editor with Canada's sport community for over 30 years.  She was the founding  editor of three sports magazines, has worked in Team Canada communications at three Olynpic Games, and been a delegate at international sports conferences.  Sheila Robertson lives in Ottawa.

For more information or to obtain books for review or examination, please contact:

Cathie Crooks, Sales/Marketing Manager

The University of Alberta Press, Ring House2, University of Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta,Canada, T6G 2E1

P: 780-492-5820  F: 780-492-0719  E: ccrooks@ualberta.ca   W: www.uap.ualberta.ca

Orders:  UNIpresses at GTW  Toll Free:1-877-864-8477  E:  orders@gtwcanada.com

To win your free copy of this essential book click here: http://www.horseownertoday.com/promo.aspx

 

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