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Traceability and Transporting Alberta Horses

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 20, 2013 09:27

Livestock Traceability – Protecting an Industry

Livestock traceability is the process of tracking individual or groups of livestock and poultry throughout their lifetime. Tracking this information is important when responding to emergencies such as disease outbreaks, floods or fires because traceability systems help determine where livestock are, where they have been and what other livestock they have could have potentially come into contact with.

Movement recording is essential to an effective traceability system. With accurate movement records, industry and government are able to identify and contain disease-exposed animals more quickly, which reduces the risk of the disease spreading to other animals.

Complying with regulations for moving livestock is part of responsible animal management that helps protect the health of your animals as well as those of other Alberta and Canadian producers. Traceability in Alberta is authorized under Alberta’s Animal Health Act. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (ARD) works with industry and all levels of government to advance traceability in Alberta and Canada.

Transportation Regulations

In Alberta, horses must be transported in accordance with Alberta’s Livestock Identification and Commerce Act (LICA). Under LICA, the term “horses” is used to include members of the Equidae family such as horses, donkeys and their crosses. Depending on the purpose of the transportation, horses may require an Alberta Livestock Manifest, Livestock Permit or Special Permit. Alberta’s delegated authority, Livestock Identification Services Ltd. (LIS), is responsible for all transportation documentation under LICA.

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development’s approved Premises Identification Numbers (PID)are to be recorded on Alberta Livestock Manifests, Livestock Permits and Special Permits to assist with trace backs in a disease outbreak. On Alberta Livestock Manifests, livestock owners/dealers are to record the PID Number of where the livestock are being transported from and the receiver is to record the PID Number of the end destination.
 

Livestock Traceability – Protecting an Industry

Livestock traceability is the process of tracking individual or groups of livestock and poultry throughout their lifetime. Tracking this information is important when responding to emergencies such as disease outbreaks, floods or fires because traceability systems help determine where livestock are, where they have been and what other livestock they have could have potentially come into contact with.

Movement recording is essential to an effective traceability system. With accurate movement records, industry and government are able to identify and contain disease-exposed animals more quickly, which reduces the risk of the disease spreading to other animals.

Complying with regulations for moving livestock is part of responsible animal management that helps protect the health of your animals as well as those of other Alberta and Canadian producers. Traceability in Alberta is authorized under Alberta’s Animal Health Act. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (ARD) works with industry and all levels of government to advance traceability in Alberta and Canada.

Transportation Regulations

In Alberta, horses must be transported in accordance with Alberta’s Livestock Identification and Commerce Act (LICA). Under LICA, the term “horses” is used to include members of the Equidae family such as horses, donkeys and their crosses. Depending on the purpose of the transportation, horses may require an Alberta Livestock Manifest, Livestock Permit or Special Permit. Alberta’s delegated authority, Livestock Identification Services Ltd. (LIS), is responsible for all transportation documentation under LICA.

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development’s approved Premises Identification Numbers (PID)are to be recorded on Alberta Livestock Manifests, Livestock Permits and Special Permits to assist with trace backs in a disease outbreak. On Alberta Livestock Manifests, livestock owners/dealers are to record the PID Number of where the livestock are being transported from and the receiver is to record the PID Number of the end destination.
A copy of each Alberta Livestock Manifest must be kept by the owner, the transporter and the person receiving the horses for 10 years from the date the manifest is completed.

Alberta Livestock Manifest books are supplied by LIS and are available throughout the province from LIS Field Offices, livestock (auction) markets and ARD Field Offices.

Livestock Traceability – Protecting an Industry

Livestock traceability is the process of tracking individual or groups of livestock and poultry throughout their lifetime. Tracking this information is important when responding to emergencies such as disease outbreaks, floods or fires because traceability systems help determine where livestock are, where they have been and what other livestock they have could have potentially come into contact with.

Movement recording is essential to an effective traceability system. With accurate movement records, industry and government are able to identify and contain disease-exposed animals more quickly, which reduces the risk of the disease spreading to other animals.

Complying with regulations for moving livestock is part of responsible animal management that helps protect the health of your animals as well as those of other Alberta and Canadian producers. Traceability in Alberta is authorized under Alberta’s Animal Health Act. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (ARD) works with industry and all levels of government to advance traceability in Alberta and Canada.

Transportation Regulations

In Alberta, horses must be transported in accordance with Alberta’s Livestock Identification and Commerce Act (LICA). Under LICA, the term “horses” is used to include members of the Equidae family such as horses, donkeys and their crosses. Depending on the purpose of the transportation, horses may require an Alberta Livestock Manifest, Livestock Permit or Special Permit. Alberta’s delegated authority, Livestock Identification Services Ltd. (LIS), is responsible for all transportation documentation under LICA.

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development’s approved Premises Identification Numbers (PID)are to be recorded on Alberta Livestock Manifests, Livestock Permits and Special Permits to assist with trace backs in a disease outbreak. On Alberta Livestock Manifests, livestock owners/dealers are to record the PID Number of where the livestock are being transported from and the receiver is to record the PID Number of the end destination.

Alberta Livestock Manifests

Alberta Livestock Manifests are used to document the movement of horses. An Alberta Livestock Manifest is required to transport or drive horses within Alberta if the horses are being transported to an inspection site or are being transported for sale or slaughter.

A copy of each Alberta Livestock Manifest must be kept by the owner, the transporter and the person receiving the horses for 10 years from the date the manifest is completed.

Alberta Livestock Manifest books are supplied by LIS and are available throughout the province from LIS Field Offices, livestock (auction) markets and ARD Field Offices.

Livestock Permits

Livestock Permits are issued by LIS Livestock Inspectors. All horses transported or driven from an inspection site (other than a feedlot or an uninspected country sale) to a destination in Alberta, or from an originating point in Alberta to a destination outside Alberta, must be accompanied by a Livestock Permit unless:

    the horses are being transported under a Special Permit (see next section for details) and are not being transported to an inspection site, or for sale or slaughter;
    the horses are accompanied by an Alberta Livestock Manifest and are being transported to an approved inspection site in Saskatchewan or British Columbia where they will be inspected upon arrival; or
    the requirement for a Livestock Permit has been waived by LIS in accordance with an exemption allowed under LICA. To learn about the exceptions under LICA, refer to the legislation at www.qp.alberta.ca.
Livestock Permits authorize a single movement of livestock from the location where the animal was inspected to the destination described on the Livestock Permit. A Livestock Permit expires seven days after the date it was issued or when the horses are delivered to their destination, whichever is earlier.

A copy of each Livestock Permit must be kept by the owner, transporter, the person receiving the horses and LIS for 10 years from the date the Livestock Permit is issued.


Special Permits

Special Permits are issued by LIS Livestock Inspectors and include the following:

    Annual Rodeo and Exhibition Permits
    Annual Horse Permits
    Lifetime Horse Permits

The Annual Rodeo and Exhibition Permits and the Annual Horse Permits are used to transport horses outside Alberta more than once in a calendar year. These permits expire on December 31 of the year in which they are issued.

A Lifetime Horse Permit allows an owner to transport a horse outside Alberta multiple times during its lifetime. Lifetime Horse Permits expire when there is a change of horse ownership or when the horse dies.

Special Permits cannot be used to transport horses to an inspection site, or for sale or slaughter.


Transporting Out-of-province Horses in Alberta

The Alberta Livestock Manifest and Livestock Permit requirements of LICA do not apply to persons who transport horses into or through Alberta from an originating point outside Alberta so long as:

    the originating jurisdiction requires the horses to be accompanied with documentation to be transported out of that jurisdiction; and
    the horses are accompanied with that documentation.

The exemption that allows horses to move into or through Alberta on out-of-province documentation expires when the horses stop in Alberta for a purpose other than rest or when they are required to be inspected in Alberta.

If out-of-province horses stop in Alberta for a purpose other than rest, the location where the horses stop should be considered the originating point when completing an Alberta Livestock Manifest or requesting a Livestock Permit.

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex14633

NEWS RELEASE - RIMBEY AG-RIM PROJECT MOVES FORWARD

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 12, 2013 08:28

Rimbey (December 10,2012) – The Rimbey Agricultural Society heads into 2013 with plans for the group’s most ambitious project ever. At the annual general meeting December 6th, members heard an update on the Agrim Centre facility. The $3.4 million building will boast close to 60,000 square feet of space, including a riding arena and 900 seat grandstand, plus meeting space and a board room. It’s to be located inside the existing track and infield of the rodeo grounds.
“We’re excited to move forward with the Agrim,” said Rimbey Ag Society President Will Mackinaw. “It’s going to be a big year for our group, and we look forward to support from the community.”
“Our feasibility study showed the potential for a two million dollar annual boost to the town of Rimbey from the building,” added Agrim spokesman Tim Edge.
A 3D model of the planned ag recreation facility was shown at the group’s meeting. Features include an outside balcony, and use of new ‘green’ technology in construction, such as a solar wall, and the ability to collect rainwater for the building’s non-potable water needs.
The project has been in the works for about a year, but organizers say the need for such a facility has been evident for years.
“Our old building has been too small for any feasible equine or bovine events in central Alberta,” said Edge. “After seeing the success of the Ponoka Ag Events Centre, our Ag Society decided to follow suit, with the full support of Ponoka County.”
In fact, the County has already committed a million dollars over two years to the project.
While some might question whether the region could support two large new ag buildings, Edge is confident the demand is already there.
“We’ve already had calls from numerous rodeo and horse groups, as well as oil related companies looking for trade show space. We can pencil in a profit if it’s used even thirty weekends a year, and we think that’s an achievable goal.”
“The possibilities for its uses are limited only by imagination, because it’s designed to be so multi-functional.”
The first phase of the project, which included the feasibility study, is complete, and a down payment has been made. Phase two, with some initial construction, is slated to begin early in the new year, after blueprints are completed.
“We appreciate the County’s support,” Edge noted. “We’re still looking for individuals and corporate partners to help make the facility a reality.”
A website with the latest information on the Agrim building project has also been launched at www.agrim.ca.
For further information contact:
Tim Edge 403-354-6730

NEWS RELEASE - RIMBEY AG-RIM PROJECT MOVES FORWARD

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 12, 2013 08:23

Rimbey (December 10,2012) – The Rimbey Agricultural Society heads into 2013 with plans for the group’s most ambitious project ever. At the annual general meeting December 6th, members heard an update on the Agrim Centre facility. The $3.4 million building will boast close to 60,000 square feet of space, including a riding arena and 900 seat grandstand, plus meeting space and a board room. It’s to be located inside the existing track and infield of the rodeo grounds.
“We’re excited to move forward with the Agrim,” said Rimbey Ag Society President Will Mackinaw. “It’s going to be a big year for our group, and we look forward to support from the community.”
“Our feasibility study showed the potential for a two million dollar annual boost to the town of Rimbey from the building,” added Agrim spokesman Tim Edge.
A 3D model of the planned ag recreation facility was shown at the group’s meeting. Features include an outside balcony, and use of new ‘green’ technology in construction, such as a solar wall, and the ability to collect rainwater for the building’s non-potable water needs.
The project has been in the works for about a year, but organizers say the need for such a facility has been evident for years.
“Our old building has been too small for any feasible equine or bovine events in central Alberta,” said Edge. “After seeing the success of the Ponoka Ag Events Centre, our Ag Society decided to follow suit, with the full support of Ponoka County.”
In fact, the County has already committed a million dollars over two years to the project.
While some might question whether the region could support two large new ag buildings, Edge is confident the demand is already there.
“We’ve already had calls from numerous rodeo and horse groups, as well as oil related companies looking for trade show space. We can pencil in a profit if it’s used even thirty weekends a year, and we think that’s an achievable goal.”
“The possibilities for its uses are limited only by imagination, because it’s designed to be so multi-functional.”
The first phase of the project, which included the feasibility study, is complete, and a down payment has been made. Phase two, with some initial construction, is slated to begin early in the new year, after blueprints are completed.
“We appreciate the County’s support,” Edge noted. “We’re still looking for individuals and corporate partners to help make the facility a reality.”
A website with the latest information on the Agrim building project has also been launched at www.agrim.ca.
For further information contact:
Tim Edge 403-354-6730

AHC Urges Horse Community to Take Part in USDA Agricultural Census

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 10, 2013 07:25



The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is preparing to conduct its 2012 USDA Census of Agriculture. Horses will be included in the Census.  Every five years, USDA conducts an agriculture census to determine the number of U.S. farms and ranches and gather vital information about U.S agriculture, including the horse community.   The census is a valuable tool to help the USDA determine land use and ownership, livestock populations, operator characteristics, production practices, farm income as well as other important information. 

“It is very important that the American horse community is properly accounted for in the upcoming Census,” said AHC president Jay Hickey.  “The information collected by the Census will influence agricultural policy for the next five years. It’s vital all farms and ranches with horses participate in the Census so the USDA has accurate information regarding the size and scope of the horse community.”

Farm or ranch owners who participated in the last Census in 2007 will automatically be mailed a survey that can be filled in and mailed back. If a farm or ranch was not part of the 2007 Census and has not received a form in the mail, the owner can go to the USDA’s census website, http://www.agcensus.usda.gov, and register. Once this form is submitted online, a survey will be mailed. Once they have received their form in the mail owners will have the option to fill out the Census online or mail back the form. 

Further information on the 2012 Census of Agriculture can be found on the USDA’s website at http://www.agcensus.usda.gov.  Farmers and ranchers should receive a Census form in the mail by early January.  Completed forms are due by February 4, 2013.
    
“Members of the horse community need to understand that even if they have a very small farm or ranch they still qualify to take part in the Census. If you made $1,000 from selling horses, stud fees or some other equine activity you should participate. If you made $1,000 from any combination of agricultural activity and have horses on the property you should participate and list those horses,” said Hickey. “But don’t forget to send in your form before the February 4th deadline.”

According to the USDA guidelines for the Census, a farm is any place from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products, including horses, were produced and sold, or normally would have been sold, during the year.


Link to article on AHC website


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As the national association representing all segments of the horse industry in Washington, D.C., the American Horse Council works daily to represent equine interests and opportunities. The AHC promotes and protects the industry by communicating with Congress, federal agencies, the media and the industry on behalf of all horse related interests each and every day.                       
 
The AHC is member supported by individuals and organizations representing virtually every facet of the horse world from owners, breeders, veterinarians, farriers, breed registries and horsemen's associations to horse shows, race tracks, rodeos, commercial suppliers and state horse councils.

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Equine Education

STEWART ANNOUNCES THIRD ANNUAL AGRICULTURE SCHOLARSHIP

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 2, 2012 12:54


Agriculture Presents Promising Career Choices for Youth
Today Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart announced the launch of the third annual Saskatchewan Agriculture Student Scholarship.
"I am pleased to announce this scholarship to help encourage our youth to pursue careers in the agriculture industry," Stewart said. "We have a strong, vibrant industry in Saskatchewan with many opportunities, creating a high demand for skilled, dedicated people."
Ten scholarships of $1,000 each will be awarded to Saskatchewan youth. Students in Grade 12 and recent graduates entering agriculture-related post-secondary studies in 2013 are eligible to apply. Applicants are asked to produce a three-minute creative video or write a well researched 750-word essay describing why agriculture, today more than ever, is a vibrant, diverse industry. Applications will be accepted until March 1, 2013. Winning submissions will be posted on the ministry website in the spring.
"There are an abundance of opportunities for our youth in agriculture, including farming and ranching, research, manufacturing, sales and agronomy, to name just a few," Stewart said. "Having well-trained youth will be critical to the future of our province and help to ensure Saskatchewan continues to be a global leader in agriculture."
For more information on the Saskatchewan Agriculture Student Scholarship, visit www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca/scholarship.
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For more information, contact:
Charlotte McGraw
Agriculture
Regina
Phone: 306-787-6969
Email: charlotte.mcgraw@gov.sk.ca

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