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Traceability and Transporting Alberta Horses

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   November 20, 2013 09:27

Livestock Traceability – Protecting an Industry

Livestock traceability is the process of tracking individual or groups of livestock and poultry throughout their lifetime. Tracking this information is important when responding to emergencies such as disease outbreaks, floods or fires because traceability systems help determine where livestock are, where they have been and what other livestock they have could have potentially come into contact with.

Movement recording is essential to an effective traceability system. With accurate movement records, industry and government are able to identify and contain disease-exposed animals more quickly, which reduces the risk of the disease spreading to other animals.

Complying with regulations for moving livestock is part of responsible animal management that helps protect the health of your animals as well as those of other Alberta and Canadian producers. Traceability in Alberta is authorized under Alberta’s Animal Health Act. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (ARD) works with industry and all levels of government to advance traceability in Alberta and Canada.

Transportation Regulations

In Alberta, horses must be transported in accordance with Alberta’s Livestock Identification and Commerce Act (LICA). Under LICA, the term “horses” is used to include members of the Equidae family such as horses, donkeys and their crosses. Depending on the purpose of the transportation, horses may require an Alberta Livestock Manifest, Livestock Permit or Special Permit. Alberta’s delegated authority, Livestock Identification Services Ltd. (LIS), is responsible for all transportation documentation under LICA.

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development’s approved Premises Identification Numbers (PID)are to be recorded on Alberta Livestock Manifests, Livestock Permits and Special Permits to assist with trace backs in a disease outbreak. On Alberta Livestock Manifests, livestock owners/dealers are to record the PID Number of where the livestock are being transported from and the receiver is to record the PID Number of the end destination.
 

Livestock Traceability – Protecting an Industry

Livestock traceability is the process of tracking individual or groups of livestock and poultry throughout their lifetime. Tracking this information is important when responding to emergencies such as disease outbreaks, floods or fires because traceability systems help determine where livestock are, where they have been and what other livestock they have could have potentially come into contact with.

Movement recording is essential to an effective traceability system. With accurate movement records, industry and government are able to identify and contain disease-exposed animals more quickly, which reduces the risk of the disease spreading to other animals.

Complying with regulations for moving livestock is part of responsible animal management that helps protect the health of your animals as well as those of other Alberta and Canadian producers. Traceability in Alberta is authorized under Alberta’s Animal Health Act. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (ARD) works with industry and all levels of government to advance traceability in Alberta and Canada.

Transportation Regulations

In Alberta, horses must be transported in accordance with Alberta’s Livestock Identification and Commerce Act (LICA). Under LICA, the term “horses” is used to include members of the Equidae family such as horses, donkeys and their crosses. Depending on the purpose of the transportation, horses may require an Alberta Livestock Manifest, Livestock Permit or Special Permit. Alberta’s delegated authority, Livestock Identification Services Ltd. (LIS), is responsible for all transportation documentation under LICA.

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development’s approved Premises Identification Numbers (PID)are to be recorded on Alberta Livestock Manifests, Livestock Permits and Special Permits to assist with trace backs in a disease outbreak. On Alberta Livestock Manifests, livestock owners/dealers are to record the PID Number of where the livestock are being transported from and the receiver is to record the PID Number of the end destination.
A copy of each Alberta Livestock Manifest must be kept by the owner, the transporter and the person receiving the horses for 10 years from the date the manifest is completed.

Alberta Livestock Manifest books are supplied by LIS and are available throughout the province from LIS Field Offices, livestock (auction) markets and ARD Field Offices.

Livestock Traceability – Protecting an Industry

Livestock traceability is the process of tracking individual or groups of livestock and poultry throughout their lifetime. Tracking this information is important when responding to emergencies such as disease outbreaks, floods or fires because traceability systems help determine where livestock are, where they have been and what other livestock they have could have potentially come into contact with.

Movement recording is essential to an effective traceability system. With accurate movement records, industry and government are able to identify and contain disease-exposed animals more quickly, which reduces the risk of the disease spreading to other animals.

Complying with regulations for moving livestock is part of responsible animal management that helps protect the health of your animals as well as those of other Alberta and Canadian producers. Traceability in Alberta is authorized under Alberta’s Animal Health Act. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (ARD) works with industry and all levels of government to advance traceability in Alberta and Canada.

Transportation Regulations

In Alberta, horses must be transported in accordance with Alberta’s Livestock Identification and Commerce Act (LICA). Under LICA, the term “horses” is used to include members of the Equidae family such as horses, donkeys and their crosses. Depending on the purpose of the transportation, horses may require an Alberta Livestock Manifest, Livestock Permit or Special Permit. Alberta’s delegated authority, Livestock Identification Services Ltd. (LIS), is responsible for all transportation documentation under LICA.

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development’s approved Premises Identification Numbers (PID)are to be recorded on Alberta Livestock Manifests, Livestock Permits and Special Permits to assist with trace backs in a disease outbreak. On Alberta Livestock Manifests, livestock owners/dealers are to record the PID Number of where the livestock are being transported from and the receiver is to record the PID Number of the end destination.

Alberta Livestock Manifests

Alberta Livestock Manifests are used to document the movement of horses. An Alberta Livestock Manifest is required to transport or drive horses within Alberta if the horses are being transported to an inspection site or are being transported for sale or slaughter.

A copy of each Alberta Livestock Manifest must be kept by the owner, the transporter and the person receiving the horses for 10 years from the date the manifest is completed.

Alberta Livestock Manifest books are supplied by LIS and are available throughout the province from LIS Field Offices, livestock (auction) markets and ARD Field Offices.

Livestock Permits

Livestock Permits are issued by LIS Livestock Inspectors. All horses transported or driven from an inspection site (other than a feedlot or an uninspected country sale) to a destination in Alberta, or from an originating point in Alberta to a destination outside Alberta, must be accompanied by a Livestock Permit unless:

    the horses are being transported under a Special Permit (see next section for details) and are not being transported to an inspection site, or for sale or slaughter;
    the horses are accompanied by an Alberta Livestock Manifest and are being transported to an approved inspection site in Saskatchewan or British Columbia where they will be inspected upon arrival; or
    the requirement for a Livestock Permit has been waived by LIS in accordance with an exemption allowed under LICA. To learn about the exceptions under LICA, refer to the legislation at www.qp.alberta.ca.
Livestock Permits authorize a single movement of livestock from the location where the animal was inspected to the destination described on the Livestock Permit. A Livestock Permit expires seven days after the date it was issued or when the horses are delivered to their destination, whichever is earlier.

A copy of each Livestock Permit must be kept by the owner, transporter, the person receiving the horses and LIS for 10 years from the date the Livestock Permit is issued.


Special Permits

Special Permits are issued by LIS Livestock Inspectors and include the following:

    Annual Rodeo and Exhibition Permits
    Annual Horse Permits
    Lifetime Horse Permits

The Annual Rodeo and Exhibition Permits and the Annual Horse Permits are used to transport horses outside Alberta more than once in a calendar year. These permits expire on December 31 of the year in which they are issued.

A Lifetime Horse Permit allows an owner to transport a horse outside Alberta multiple times during its lifetime. Lifetime Horse Permits expire when there is a change of horse ownership or when the horse dies.

Special Permits cannot be used to transport horses to an inspection site, or for sale or slaughter.


Transporting Out-of-province Horses in Alberta

The Alberta Livestock Manifest and Livestock Permit requirements of LICA do not apply to persons who transport horses into or through Alberta from an originating point outside Alberta so long as:

    the originating jurisdiction requires the horses to be accompanied with documentation to be transported out of that jurisdiction; and
    the horses are accompanied with that documentation.

The exemption that allows horses to move into or through Alberta on out-of-province documentation expires when the horses stop in Alberta for a purpose other than rest or when they are required to be inspected in Alberta.

If out-of-province horses stop in Alberta for a purpose other than rest, the location where the horses stop should be considered the originating point when completing an Alberta Livestock Manifest or requesting a Livestock Permit.

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex14633

HORSE-TRANSPORT VIOLATIONS UNCOVERED, OFFICIALS FAIL TO ACT

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 26, 2013 16:23


Secretly Taped, Horse Hauler Admits to Using Invalid Health Documents—PETA Files Complaints With State Agencies

Morton, Texas — A PETA undercover investigator has documented evidence of serious violations involving apparent fraudulent veterinary health forms in the transport of horses across state lines from Iowa into Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas. Twice last year, the PETA investigator rode along with a "kill buyer"—someone who purchases horses and transports them to slaughterhouses or feedlots—as he moved horses he had purchased in Iowa through Missouri and Kansas to feedlots and transfer points in Oklahoma and Texas. The kill buyer was caught on tape admitting that the veterinary forms he carried "certifying" that the horses in his trailer were free of deadly equine infectious anemia (EIA)—a potentially fatal viral disease with no known cure or preventive vaccine—were actually those of other horses, not those of the horses on board his truck, and that his veterinarian had taught him how to falsify the EIA forms.

Although the Texas Animal Health Commission and the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry had been made aware that the kill buyer, by his own admission, was bringing horses into the states without valid EIA paperwork—unloading potentially infected horses onto crowded feedlots, risking the health of hundreds of other horses throughout each state—officials have taken no action. PETA is now calling on officials to investigate this failure to act and has posted action alerts on its popular website urging its supporters to do the same.

"Agency inaction means that potentially infected horses traveling from Iowa to Texas may have spread this deadly disease from the Oklahoma and Texas feedlots to the entire states," says PETA President Ingrid E. Newkirk. "While agencies look the other way, kill buyers like this one are still transporting horses today."

Broadcast-quality video footage and PETA's complaints are available upon request. For more information, please visit PETA.org.

Notice to the Industry - Equine Herpes at Sports Creek

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 15, 2013 10:13

Report of case of Equine Herpes at Sports Creek in Michigan

The Ontario Racing Commission (ORC) has been made aware of a case of Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1) in a horse that raced at Sports Creek Raceway on December 19th.

Due to the report of this confirmed case, ORC Veterinarian Supervisor Dr. Bruce Duncan advises that Ontario racetracks need to be cautious. “The racing industry is very mobile. While it is up to the discretion of the track, I strongly recommend that race secretaries not accept entries from horses that have raced at this track in the past 30 days.”

http://www.ontarioracingcommission.com/whatsnew.aspx?id=882&utm_source=Health_Flash_January_2013&utm_campaign=Health+Flash+Jan_13&utm_medium=email

HOW CAN HORSE OWNERS PRACTISE GOOD BIOSECURITY?

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   September 19, 2012 11:04

 
Equine Guelph's eWorkshop Helps You Protect Your Horse from Infectious Diseases -  "Beat the Bugs" with Biosecurity
 
 
Guelph, Ontario - Back by popular demand, Equine Guelph has announced the second offering of the Biosecurity Prevention eWorkshop from October 22 - November 4, 2012.  Equine Guelph's new eWorkshops are two-week online short courses designed for busy horse owners. They provide the latest evidence-based information available from University of Guelph and industry experts.
 
Take a look at Equine Guelph's Report on Research video with University of Guelph's Dr. Scott Weese outlining practical points of what a horse owner can do to reduce the chances of his or her horse catching an infectious disease such as West Nile Virus.
 
Dr. Weese, who also authors the "Worms and Germs" blog, says "Having a basic infection control plan in place is probably the biggest thing someone can do to reduce the risk of disease."
 
Weese goes on to stress, "It does not matter what you do with your horse(s), or whether you have only one horse, or a herd of 100, as an owner you should have a general idea of the measures you are going to take in order to reduce the risk of infection."
 
Weese has been working in the area of biosecurity and infection control for over 15 years, always looking for better ways to prevent and treat infectious diseases with a strong emphasis on prevention. He gives talks at Equine Guelph's new biosecurity workshops and two week eWorkshop.
 
In fact, Weese was the first speaker at Equine Guelph's "Beat the Bugs" biosecurity workshops launched last April for horse enthusiasts around the globe. He says, "Equine Guelph's biosecurity programs are great for getting people thinking in a broader context when it comes to infection control and putting into practice the easy day-to-day steps which can reduce outbreaks of disease."
 
The two week eWorkshop introduces practical steps that are easy to make into daily habits including:
 
1. Identifying risks of infectious disease in the barn and creating a practical biosecurity plan.
 
2. Reducing risks of disease by having and using hand washing stations, clean footwear and rules for visitors.
 
3. Having protocols for isolating new and returning horses. Biosecurity is just as important on the road and when visiting other venues. Disease is easily spread through equipment sharing.
 
The first eWorkshop was positively received:
 
Patty Russen, New York, USA said, "This course offered extensive information on biosecurity. I believe it to be valuable, and even essential, for any barn owner or for any horse owner/boarder that wants to protect and give their horse the best and safest conditions possible." 
 
"Beat the Bugs" is an awareness campaign developed by Equine Guelph with the assistance of 13 industry partners: the American Association of Equine Practitioners Foundation, Colorado State University, the Central Ontario Standardbred Association, Grand River Agricultural Society, Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Association, Ontario Association of Equine Practitioners, Ontario Equestrian Federation, Ontario Harness Horse Association, Ontario Horse Racing Industry Association, Ontario Veterinary College, Standardbred Canada, Vétoquinol Canada Inc. and Woodbine Entertainment Group.
 
The program is funded through the Agricultural Biosecurity Program (ABP), part of the Best Practices Suite of programs under Growing Forward, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative. The Agricultural Adaptation Council assists in the delivery of several Growing Forward programs in Ontario.
 
For more information about Equine Guelph's biosecurity programs and to view the Biosecurity Calculator please visit www.EquineGuelph.ca/biosecurity.php or contact Susan Raymond at
Equine Guelph, slraymon@uoguelph.ca.
 
Equine Guelph offers award-winning online education from one of the top universities in Canada - the University of Guelph.   Students benefit from insights offered by leading industry experts from across North America. Equine Guelph's online program has attracted over 1,000 students from all around the world, including every province in Canada, the United States, France, United Arab Emirates, Korea, Egypt, Australia, Austria, Poland, Denmark, Norway, Italy, Israel, Columbia, India and South Africa. Equine Guelph is known worldwide as one of the most respected online equine learning communities.
 
Don't miss out- on the next two-week eWorkshop October 22 - November 4, 2012. Cost is $75 + HST.
 
Visit http://www.equineguelph.ca/biosecurity_esessions.php for course details.
 
 
                                                             
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Equine Education

An End to Canada’s Horse Slaughter Industry in Sight?

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   June 3, 2012 20:52

An End to Canada’s Horse Slaughter Industry in Sight?

Orangeville, Ontario:  On May 31, 2012, the Canadian Horse Defence Coalition (CHDC) released its report “CFIA and the Art of Evasion”, http://canadianhorsedefencecoalition.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/cfia-and-the-art-of-evasion.pdf, in response to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s deflection tactics to questions concerning the welfare of horses in Canada’s horse slaughter plants, as well as the safety of horsemeat for human consumption.

On the same day, the Daily Racing Form reported that two slaughterhouses, Bouvry Exports in Fort Macleod, Alberta, and Viandes Richelieu in Massueville, Quebec, will no longer be accepting Thoroughbreds: http://www.drf.com/news/canadian-slaughterhouse-firm-no-longer-accepting-thoroughbreds.

Thoroughbreds comprise approximately 14% of the total number of horses slaughtered in Canada for the meat market.  The vast majority of horsemeat is shipped overseas to Europe and Asia for human consumption.  It is a known fact that 99% of Thoroughbreds in the racing industry, at some point in their careers, have been administered drugs such as phenylbutazone, which are prohibited from entering the food chain.

Today we ask the CFIA:  What now?  This news may be the beginning of the decline of the horsemeat industry.  Thoroughbreds are not the only horses to receive drugs prohibited from being used for human consumption.  Horses from all directions enter the slaughter market.  They come from trail riding businesses, family farms, the rodeo circuit, and other facets of the racing industry, such as Standardbred harness racing and Quarter Horse racing.

The CFIA relies heavily upon an Equine Information Document (EID) system to determine whether horses headed for slaughter have been administered drugs.  However, this faulty system is, in turn, reliant upon the honesty of irresponsible owners wishing to offload their horses, as well as unscrupulous feedlot operators whose only interest in horse slaughter is the profit that can be made from this practice.

The safety of Canadian horsemeat cannot be guaranteed.  Neither is equine slaughter a humane process.  It is fraught with animal welfare violations, as proven by numerous undercover investigations:  http://www.defendhorsescanada.org/investigations.html

Today, we further ask the Thoroughbred racing industry:  What now?  The slaughter option has been removed from two large Canadian slaughter plants.  Will the industry now begin to truly work to protect its race horses through industry subsidized adoption programs and promote responsible horse husbandry that will include retainment and rehoming of Thoroughbreds, instead of silently allowing the untimely deaths of the very horses who make their industry possible?

The Canadian government can run, but it cannot hide from the truth.  There is no such thing as the humane slaughter of an easily-panicked flight animal such as the horse.  Further, there is no way to guarantee that the meat of horses can be free from drug contaminants.  They are our companions and our working partners, and many have been medicated with substances that can be risky to human health if consumed.

Canada must abolish horse slaughter without delay.

http://canadianhorsedefencecoalition.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/an-end-to-canadas-horse-slaughter-industry-in-sight-2/

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general

Fight Against Equine Infectious Disease Helped by Equine Foundation of Canada

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   February 16, 2012 11:39

 

With a highly mobile horse community, keeping your horses free from disease is one of the biggest challenges for horse owners.  The fight to keep infectious diseases at bay has taken a step forward with a generous donation from the Equine Foundation of Canada.  The funding allows the purchase of new equipment, including a microcentrifuge and fluorometer, for the Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses at the University of Guelph.

 

"This equipment will help us explore some new areas in equine infectious diseases and hopefully help us understand how to better treat and prevent serious infections. We are grateful for the assistance of the Equine Foundation of Canada in advancing equine infectious disease research.” says Dr. Scott Weese, an equine internal medicine specialist and microbiologist with the Ontario Veterinary College and University of Guelph’s Centre for Public Health and Zoonoses.

 

The funding for this equipment will help advance the specialized work being done in his lab, and complement the array of equipment that is already present in the laboratory, including a state-of-the-art ‘next generation’ sequencing system. “Our laboratory was the first laboratory of any type in Canada to obtain this system, and it provides a unique capability internationally to perform equine infectious diseases research,” continues Weese.

 

With increased awareness of the dangers of infectious disease, recently heightened by the news of an equine herpesvirus (EHV-1) fatality in Ontario, this is a timely and welcome development.  “Biosecurity, the prevention of disease spread, is an issue of growing concern for the industry.  Equine Guelph will be working with Dr. Weese and his staff to get more information out to the horse industry in our communications and education programs.  The Equine Foundation of Canada has helped us to move this agenda forward with their funding for new equipment and are to be commended for their initiative to help the Canadian horse industry in this way.” says Gayle Ecker, Director of Equine Guelph.  Registration is now open for the new education program “Beat the Bugs: Biosecurity for the Horse Owner” which launches this spring.  Members of the equine industry will take away valuable information for themselves and for their employees to help prevent the spread of infectious disease.

 

For more information about Biosecurity programs offered by Equine Guelph visit: http://www.equineguelph.ca/biosecurity.php or contact:  Dr. Susan Raymond (slraymon@uoguelph.ca)

 

 

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disease | entertainment

Biosecurity Tool – Does Your Barn get the Green Light?

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   February 14, 2012 18:37

 

With all the breaking news on the importance of biosecurity – Isn’t it time to bone up on preventative measures your barn could be taking?   Calculate your horse farm’s risks with Equine Guelph’s Biosecurity Risk Calculator, a tool designed for horse owners to generate a report that grades them on their biosecurity management practices on their farms.  See if you score a green, amber or red light.

Live and online at Biosecurity Calculator, the interactive tool is an educational resource of Equine Guelph (University of Guelph) developed in collaboration with Colorado State University and sponsored by the American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Foundation and Vétoquinol Canada Inc.

 

"Every horse owner should think about a biosecurity management plan,” says Karen Ann Paradis, Equine Product Manager of Vétoquinol. “Having a solid understanding of equine health, infectious disease and disease control is paramount in reducing biosecurity risk in a high-risk industry."

 

After taking the 10 minute, 42 question Biosecurity Calculator quiz - turn those amber scores green by increasing your knowledge with Equine Guelph’s biosecurity workshops this March and 2 week e-Session April 16 - 29.    The combined feedback from the Biosecurity Calculator and Equine Guelph’s upcoming programs will provide you with the best practices for decreasing risk of infectious disease in your horse(s).  

 

To learn more about Equine Guelph’s biocesurity programs visit:    www.EquineGuelph.ca/biosecurity.php

Biosecurity Workshop @ e-Session Dates Announced by Equine Guelph

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 26, 2012 13:45

January 26, 2012– Find out what steps you can take to protect your barn from sporadic disease, outbreaks and infectious diseases.

 

“The recent devastating outbreak of EHV-1 in North America has highlighted the importance of infection control and biosecurity, as well as the deficiencies in knowledge and application that are present across the industry,” says Scott Weese, associate professor and Canada Research Chair at the University of Guelph.  Proof-positive that the time for prevention has now arrived is the January 2012 biosecurity update from Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs confirming cases of Equine Herpes in Southern Ontario.

 

Equine Guelph’s “Beat the Bugs with Biosecurity,” program promotes biosecurity throughout all sectors of the horse industry. The program is funded through the Agricultural Biosecurity Program (ABP), part of the Best Practices Suite of programs under Growing Forward, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative. The Agricultural Adaptation Council assists in the delivery of several Growing Forward programs in Ontario.

 

“Increasing knowledge of best biosecurity practices stands to benefit the horse industry by reducing the risk of disease transmission and, in turn, could create a huge positive economic impact and prevent a potential catastrophic outbreak,”  says Equine Guelph director, Gayle Ecker.

 

The “Beat the Bugs” program includes four workshops, conducted by biosecurity specialists, offered free of charge on a first come, first served basis. The workshops are scheduled as follows:  Mohawk Racetrack, Campbellville, March 7, 1 – 3pm; Western Fair, London (during Can-Am), March 16, 10am – noon; Kemptville College, Kemptville, March 24, 2 – 4pm; and Georgian Downs, Barrie, March 27, 1:30 – 3:30pm.  Contact Susan Raymond at Equine Guelph, slraymon@uoguelph.ca, to register and for more information.

 

For those who are looking to take their biosecurity knowledge to the next level, a two-week Equine Biosecurity e-Session is available April 16 – 29 for $75 (plus HST) per person.  Contact Susan Raymond at Equine Guelph, slraymon@uoguelph.ca, to register and for more information.

 

“Beat the Bugs” has been developed by Equine Guelph with the assistance of its 11 industry partners: American Association of Equine Practitioners Foundation, Central Ontario Standardbred Association, Colorado State University, Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Association, Ontario Association of Equine Practitioners, Ontario Equestrian Federation, Ontario Harness Horse Association, Ontario Horse Racing Industry Association, Ontario Veterinary College, Standardbred Canada, Vétoquinol Canada Inc. and Woodbine Entertainment Group.

 

For more information on the “Beat the Bugs with Biosecurity” initiative, and to view the Biosecurity Risk Calculator, visit www.EquineGuelph.ca/biosecurity.php.

 

 

 

 

 

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disease | groom

Biosecurity Update: New EHV-1 case in Canada

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   January 23, 2012 14:18

   Veterinary Update

Animal Health and Welfare Branch/Office of the Chief Veterinarian for Ontario

Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs


 

                                                    January 19, 2012

Confirmed Case of Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy in Southern Ontario

The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) has been notified of a confirmed case of Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM), caused by equine herpes virus 1 (EHV-1),  in Southern Ontario.  A blood sample from a horse with severe neurological signs tested positive for EHV-1 in early January. The horse was euthanized after its condition deteriorated.  On a second farm in the same area, another horse with similar signs was euthanized in late December.  No samples were collected from that horse.

 

In 2011, there was one laboratory-confirmed case and one suspect case of EHM in Ontario.

 

EHV-1 infection in horses can cause respiratory disease, abortion, neonatal foal death, and/or neurological disease.  EHV-1 is not a federally Reportable Disease.  

 

Because infected horses may show no clinical signs, but still shed the virus, the temperature of suspect animals should be monitored twice daily for 14 -21 days and any abnormalities discussed with a veterinarian. Neurological signs include loss of muscle coordination, lethargy, inability to urinate, reduced tail tone and/or head tilt.  It is important that a veterinarian assess suspect cases of EHM, since it can be difficult to distinguish between this and other serious diseases, such as rabies, that can affect the nervous system in horses.

 

EHV-1 is easily spread by sharing contaminated equipment, contact with an animal carrying the virus, or by the clothing, hands or equipment of visitors to farms who recently had contact with an infected horse. 

 

All horse owners should be reminded to practice vaccination and appropriate biosecurity protocols and procedures (see links below) for horses and equipment coming on and off the farm, particularly if traveling to shows or events. 

 

Current EHV vaccines may reduce viral shedding but are not protective against the neurological form of the disease. Implementing routine biosecurity practices is the best way to minimize the spread of this disease.

 

Increased vigilance is needed in the equine industry at this time.  In cases of neurological disease, a veterinarian’s first obligation is to rule out rabies if the animal dies or is euthanized, by submitting a brain sample to CFIA. Appropriate personal protection, such as gloves and a face shield, should be used when collecting samples.

The resources listed below contain excellent information on basic biosecurity practices and infection control.

 

Equine Herpes Virus is an opportunity to remind your clients that the best method of disease control is disease prevention.




 

 

RESOURCES

 

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

 

http://blogs.usask.ca/EHRF/EHV%20fact%20sheet-1.MAR.20.pdf

 

 

OMAFRA

 

http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/facts/prev-disease-spread.htm

 

http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/horses/health.html

 

 

EQUINE GUELPH

 

http://www.equineguelph.ca/education/equiplanner_guidelines_strangles.php

 

http://www.equineguelph.ca/pdf/facts/vacc_guidelines_print_FINAL.pdf

 

 

AMERICAN PLANT AND HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE

 

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahss/equine/ehv/equine_herpesvirus_brochure_2009.pdf

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competition | dressage | employment | groom | disease