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"The Hunter of Buffalo" by Andrea Lawrence

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   August 18, 2011 08:50

"The Hunter of Buffalo"

by Andrea Lawrence

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Blair Braaten - Chariot & Chuckwagon Speedster

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   August 9, 2011 13:55

Photo credit from left to right:

Photo 1 and 2 taken in Nipawin, Sask. by Kara; Photo 3 & 4 taken in Invermay, Sask.: Photo 5 taken in Porcupine Plain, Sask. by Lorelle.

HorseOwnerToday had the opportunity to interview Blair Braaten.  She is an accomplished chariot and chuckwagon driver (or is the term driverette?).  Her positive attitude and humour are obvious, and the fact that she is a fierce competitor. 

She just "likes to go fast" and be safe.

 

1)    Blair,  tell HorseOwnerToday.com about your journey into the chariot and chuckwagon racing world.

I am a 3rd generation wagon driver, so I guess you could say I was born with racing in my blood. My journey into the racing world began when I was 8 months old being hauled to the stands in the stroller to watch the races. As I got older I was able to help with little things like doing up the harness, taping the tugs, and holding the lines. Soon I was old enough to start driving a chariot (2 horses) for practice at home in the field. At age 15 I started racing chariots competitively. After 5 years of racing chariots I picked up the wagon lines. I still love racing just as much today as I did when I first started 9 years ago.

2) HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED RESISTANCE FROM YOUR COMPETITORS BECAUSE YOU ARE A WOMAN?

I have experienced very little resistance from my fellow competitors because I am a female driver. There is the odd person or two who don’t believe girls should be competing in the sport, but the majority of the drivers are very supporting and encouraging…. Even when they do get beat by a girl!!!

3) WHAT CHANGES HAVE YOU SEEN IN THE CHARIOT AND CHUCKWAGON RACING IN THE PAST 5 YEARS?

Previously each club had their own measure. Horses were measured with a bar that would have to pass over the horses wither in order for them to be eligible to run. Now horses are measured with a laser system (a beam of light that travels from a stationary tripod). It is standard across Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta at 58½ inches so now if your horse is branded you can go run in any club.  The other changes are:   number of lady drivers has increased, as well as the youth participation.

4) WHAT CHANGES DO YOU PREDICT FOR THE FUTURE OF CHARIOT AND CHUCKWAGON RACING IN THE NEXT 5 YEARS?

Chariot and chuckwagon racing is a very family and friend oriented sport. As long as promotion of the sport continues, good sportsmanship amongst the drivers, and providing the public with the best races possible, I predict that racing will continue for a long time.

5) WHAT CHANGES DO YOU PREDICT FOR THE FUTURE OF BLAIR BRAATEN RACING IN THE NEXT 5 YEARS?

It’s hard to say exactly what the future holds, I hope I have the opportunity to try new horses to see what can be made of them and that I can continue to drive safe, have fun, go FAST,

6) IS IT EXPENSIVE TO GO DOWN THE ROAD? TRAIN 12 MONTHS OF THE YEAR? HOW DO YOU FINANCE YOUR RACING TEAM?

It is an expensive hobby. The cost of fuel, feed and maintenance adds up pretty quickly. When top day money only pays $100, you realize then how important your sponsors are. In order to finance your summer racing, you work the rest of the year.

7) TELL ABOUT YOUR HORSE PROGRAM – RAISING, SELECTING AND TRAINING. HOW DO YOU KEEP THEM HEALTHY, DISEASE FREE AND RUNNING THEIR BEST?

On average we raise 10 colts/year. Most of the mares are horse/quarter horse/thoroughbreds who’s racing career have ended. They are bred to either a thoroughbred or a quarterhorse.  At weaning time (approx. 5 months old) they are halter broke and handled. They are sent out to pasture as yearlings and brought back in as 2 year olds. It is then that we take a good look at their size and body build. The bigger ones are then selected to start being broke to drive. Most of this training of the young ones is done during the winter months. Training/conditioning of the mature herd begins in April (depending on the weather). They are put on a monitored diet consisting of oats, canola oil, molasses, and a vitamin/mineral supplement (powder and pellet form) and hay. Our conditioning program begins slowly, with the emphasis on preparing/achieving speed and endurance. They are kept healthy by proper feed and exercise, regular shots, and massage/treatments when necessary.

Awards/Achievements

2004 – Most Sportsmanlike Driver

2006 – High Point Jr. Chariot

2007 – Most Sportsmanlike Driver

2008 – Rookie Wagon Driver

2008 – Most Sportsmanlike Driver

2009 – Penalty Free Wagon

Numerous Best Dressed Chariot & Chuckwagon awards

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The Horses of Leonardo da Vinci

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   August 4, 2011 09:16

The Four Horses of Apollo

The Fall of Phaeton

http://www.theequinest.com/the-horses-of-leonardo-da-vinci/

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Farm Safety: Children on the Farm

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 31, 2011 18:38

Brenda Stefanson, PAg

Farm Business Management Specialist

Regional Services, Ministry of Agriculture

Watrous Regional Office

 

Farm families have always worked together to build successful farm operations. On many farms, the human resource plan assigns much of the labour and management tasks to family members, young and old.  Today’s young farm operators learned their production and management knowledge as they worked side-by-side with parents and grandparents. Now, they will pass these skills on to another generation of farm kids.

Family farm life provides a stimulating learning environment for children of all ages. The knowledge and the work ethic they develop while helping on the family farm will serve them well in their future careers. However, the farm is also a workplace in which numerous health and safety hazards are present. Here’s some practical and common sense advice for busy farm families to ensure the safety, health and well being of their children and teenagers.

Identify Hazards. There are numerous hazards on a farm including machinery, chemicals, unpredictable livestock, enclosed spaces (grain storage, etc.), and electricity.  An important step to preventing tragedy is to make a list of all the things that could seriously harm a younger child. Develop fenced-off safe play areas to keep toddlers and younger children away from workplace hazards. As children grow older and increasingly participate in farm activities, continue to work with them to assess the hazards and ensure that older children are appropriately trained.

Base Expectations on Both Age and Maturity. Children grow and mature at different rates. Young adults tend to overestimate their skill and knowledge levels when asked if they can perform a task. Parents are the best judge of when a young adult has the maturity to take on farm chores that are hazardous. Initial training and supervision is important to ensure your child can do the chore safely.

Emphasize Safety and Model Safe Behaviour. Consider your own behaviour in busy and difficult times. Do you take shortcuts that compromise safety? Children will learn your habits… both good and bad. Keep them safe as they learn about farm work through the consistent demonstration of your own good habits and safe work practices.

Develop and Enforce a Safe Environment.  Set up appropriate rules for your children to follow and monitor them consistently. Utilize the many government and community agencies that focus on farm safety to learn more about protecting your loved ones on the family farm.

The Agriculture Health and Safety Network, the Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety, and the Ministry of Agriculture can provide you with information and resources to help you keep your family and employees safe as they work and play this summer. As we look forward to a busy and productive growing season and our children enjoy their summer vacation, keep safety in mind.

For more information, please contact:

Watrous Regional Services Office at (306) 946-3220,

Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377or

Visit our website at www.agriculture.gov.sk.ca.

 

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Paying It Forward

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 9, 2011 07:55

 

 

April 13, 2012 Thanks to Modular Storage Systems of Saskatoon.  They provided a prize "MODey the Dragon" via their booth at the Homestyle Show for children, Wyatt of Saskatoon was the lucky winner. 

Nicolle Griffith
Assistant General Manager

Modular Storage Systems

Regina - Saskatoon - Winnipeg

121 Gyles Pl

Saskatoon, SK    S7L 6C5
Phone: 306.717.8227 | Fax: 
855.282.5297

nicolleg@modularstorage.com

Does someone ever make you feel good, out of the blue, with a small gesture?  Andrea Lawrence and Terry of Competition Muffler and Shock did that for me.  They are the catalyst for this "paying it forward".....

Thanks to courteous drivers.....August 1, 2011

Thanks to an very thoughtful man in the Costco parking lot, he asked if he could return my cart to the store when he returned his...a bright cheerful smile was included...July 14,2011

Thanks for making my son laugh Andrea!  Andrea Lawrence, a creative talented woman took the time to "play with" as she call it, some photos.  The results include several cartoon characters with my son's face. http://www.fineartamerica.com/profiles/andrea-lawwrence.html July 6, 2011

 

Thanks to Terry from Competition Muffler and Shock, Saskatoon.  Terry provided a part, installed on my muffler and then said "Have a good weekend!"  I stood there with my cc and I am sure a ludicrous expression, again he said "Enjoy the weekend" and answered the telephone.  This gesture certainly changed my outlook on the afternoon, the rush hour traffic wasn't as stressful, the list of errands not as long, Thanks Terry and Competition Muffler and Shock for changing my Friday and fixing my muffler.

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General

"Gimcrack on Newmarket Heath, with a Trainer, a Stable -Lad, and a Jockey' by George Stubbs

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   July 6, 2011 07:01

 "Gimcrack on Newmarket Heath, with a Trainer, a Stable-Lad, and a Jockey" by George Stubbs

 

"Gimcrack on Newmarket Heath, with a Trainer, a Stable-Lad, and a Jockey" fetched 22.4 million pounds ($35.9 million) at Christie's in London on Tuesday, (June 4, 2011), the third most valuable old mater painting to be sold at auction, the company said.

The work was painted by Stubbs, renowned for his anatomically precise portrayals of horses, in 1765, and was described by the auctioneer as a "true masterpiece."

It depicts Gimcrack, one of th emost admired 18th centure racehorses which won 28 of his 36 races and finished unplaced only once.

The painting shoes Gimcrack twice -- in the background winning a "trial" and in the foreground with his trainer and jockey, a stable lad rubbing him down.

To continue reading go to  http://www.reuters.com



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Cliff's Mastiff Puppies

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   June 15, 2011 10:57

 

 

clifjef@yahoo.ca for more information

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Welcome

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   June 11, 2011 10:00

Welcome to the blog for Horse Owner Today.

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Andrea Lawrence Photographs Spring in Saskatchewan

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   May 29, 2011 11:11

For other great Andrea Lawrence photos go to:  http://www.horseownertoday.com/vendor.aspx?vid=26

Have a colourful life and may the winds of heaven blow through your horses ears!

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Andrea Lawrence and her art.

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   March 1, 2011 19:26

A Touch of Horse Heaven 2 by Andrea Lawrence

Tell HorseOwnerToday.com the story behind Andrea Lawrence and her art.

 I grew up in a small town just outside of Regina. Living on a ranch, for a young girl, had its good points and bad points. It was good that I had the horses in my life to keep me busy and in great shape, but sometimes the work that went with it was hard. Between trail rides, showing and doing the chores, I found myself trying to find some peace and quiet by writing poems and drawing pictures.  I had also always enjoyed taking pictures.  In 2001, I decided on a change in careers, and took a computer course along with other classes. One day, I opened up the Adobe Photoshop program, and I accidentally 'manipulated' the photo I had on the screen. The rest is history. I had finally found my medium in which to work, and blend my drawings, photographs and poetry.  I am a published poet, and write some 'cowboy' poetry. I have sold art out of the Letter Box Art Gallery in Lumsden SK, and have my images for sale on my website at:

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/andrea-lawrence.html

What changes have occurred within the digital photography art scene in the last several years?

You will find thousands of images covering a wide variety of things. It is nice, however, to see the world through someone else's eyes. It is better if you have an imagination, and make people sit up and take notice. I will not continuously try to create similar images, but try to see something within the picture and bring it out. I hand draw images using the mouse, as well as manipulate my photographs. I am constantly learning new programs in order to keep a step ahead of the competition.

What will be HOT art this spring?

I think any art that touches some ones soul, or reminds them of a time in their life when they were healthy and happy will be the 'hot art'. It does not matter what type of art it is, it has to grab you. If my art makes you shake your head, or say "wow", then I have succeeded by getting a reaction out of you. Everyone has different taste, but I am sure I have something you will like, and that is just twisted enough to make you want to own it. Have a colourful life, and may the winds of heaven blow through your horses ears.

 

 

 

 

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