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Your Hurricane Action Plan

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   August 3, 2012 09:12

 

Check out Public Safety Canada’s site, www.getprepared.ca, to find out how to prepare for any kind of emergency or potential disaster. On that site you’ll find lots of information about how to make your personal emergency plan and what you should put in an emergency kit.

Here is an action plan of what you need to do before a hurricane becomes a threat:

1. Learn about hurricanes – Find out if hurricanes could be a threat to you. Visit the Canadian Hurricane Centre’s website to learn as much as you can. Go to the Climatology section of the website to learn if you are in an area that is visited by tropical cyclones and to see what such cyclones have done in the past. In particular, visit the section on Hazards and Impacts, which outlines the four basic threats posed by hurricanes or tropical storms in Canada:

2. Secure your home - You can make your home more secure and less vulnerable to storms. Once you know your vulnerability or areas of weakness, you can take steps to protect your family, pets and property.

First, make sure that you have the proper home insurance, which covers for specific losses where you suspect you are vulnerable. If insurance companies suspect that you are more vulnerable in certain ways, this will be factored into the amount of risk they are willing to take. This will in turn be reflected in the cost of your insurance. Doing whatever you can to reduce your vulnerability could also reduce your insurance costs.

Second, put the time and money into strengthening the areas where you are vulnerable. For example, if you already know that you have a basement flooding problem during heavy rain events, you can seal your foundation or other areas where water is finding its way in, build drainage ditches to divert water away from your house, and make sure that you have a working sump-pump. If wind is your greatest threat, you can strengthen the exterior of your home to keep wind from breaking in by doing things like protecting and reinforcing your roof, windows and doors (including garage doors). Construction experts can advise you on your exact needs. There is little you can do ahead of time to protect your home or property from storm surge and large coastal waves. The best thing you can do when storm surge or large waves are on the way is to move away from the coast.

Third, if a power outage would cause serious problems for you, you may want to consider having a backup generator that will supply enough power to meet your essential needs (like in the case of essential medical or supportive equipment). Most emergency plans focus on being self-reliant for the first 72 hours after disaster strikes, but if your needs extend beyond that, then this must be part of your personal plan.

3. Develop a family plan – Make sure everyone knows what to do, where to go and how to stay connected to information sources. Your family's plan should be based on your specific vulnerability to the hurricane hazards. Keep a written plan and share it with other friends or family.

Check out Public Safety Canada’s site, www.getprepared.ca, and let them help you create your own personalized family emergency plan. It will highlight things to consider such as

  • safe exits from home and neighbourhood
  • meeting places to reunite with family or roommates
  • designated person to pick up children should you be unavailable
  • contact persons (close-by and out-of-town)
  • health information
  • place for your pet to stay
  • risks in your region
  • location of your fire extinguisher, water valve, electrical box, gas valve and floor drain

4. Create an emergency supply kit - There are certain items you need to have regardless of where you ride out a hurricane. It’s important to keep it fully stocked with what you need and for everyone in your home to know where it is kept. You can either buy an assembled kit or create your own from things commonly found in your home. You should also consider an emergency car kit.

Public Safety Canada’s site has details of what to put in your home emergency kit and your car emergency kit.

5. Information sources – Make sure that you know where to get the latest weather forecasts and public announcements from emergency managers. During a disaster, battery-operated radios are the most reliable way to get information. However, in the days leading up to a hurricane, these websites will provide the best up-to-the-minute information:

National:

Provincial Emergency Measures Organizations (EMOs):

Regional Weather Forecasts:

 

 

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Your Hurricane Action Plan

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   August 3, 2012 09:10

 

Check out Public Safety Canada’s site, www.getprepared.ca, to find out how to prepare for any kind of emergency or potential disaster. On that site you’ll find lots of information about how to make your personal emergency plan and what you should put in an emergency kit.

Here is an action plan of what you need to do before a hurricane becomes a threat:

1. Learn about hurricanes – Find out if hurricanes could be a threat to you. Visit the Canadian Hurricane Centre’s website to learn as much as you can. Go to the Climatology section of the website to learn if you are in an area that is visited by tropical cyclones and to see what such cyclones have done in the past. In particular, visit the section on Hazards and Impacts, which outlines the four basic threats posed by hurricanes or tropical storms in Canada:

2. Secure your home - You can make your home more secure and less vulnerable to storms. Once you know your vulnerability or areas of weakness, you can take steps to protect your family, pets and property.

First, make sure that you have the proper home insurance, which covers for specific losses where you suspect you are vulnerable. If insurance companies suspect that you are more vulnerable in certain ways, this will be factored into the amount of risk they are willing to take. This will in turn be reflected in the cost of your insurance. Doing whatever you can to reduce your vulnerability could also reduce your insurance costs.

Second, put the time and money into strengthening the areas where you are vulnerable. For example, if you already know that you have a basement flooding problem during heavy rain events, you can seal your foundation or other areas where water is finding its way in, build drainage ditches to divert water away from your house, and make sure that you have a working sump-pump. If wind is your greatest threat, you can strengthen the exterior of your home to keep wind from breaking in by doing things like protecting and reinforcing your roof, windows and doors (including garage doors). Construction experts can advise you on your exact needs. There is little you can do ahead of time to protect your home or property from storm surge and large coastal waves. The best thing you can do when storm surge or large waves are on the way is to move away from the coast.

Third, if a power outage would cause serious problems for you, you may want to consider having a backup generator that will supply enough power to meet your essential needs (like in the case of essential medical or supportive equipment). Most emergency plans focus on being self-reliant for the first 72 hours after disaster strikes, but if your needs extend beyond that, then this must be part of your personal plan.

3. Develop a family plan – Make sure everyone knows what to do, where to go and how to stay connected to information sources. Your family's plan should be based on your specific vulnerability to the hurricane hazards. Keep a written plan and share it with other friends or family.

Check out Public Safety Canada’s site, www.getprepared.ca, and let them help you create your own personalized family emergency plan. It will highlight things to consider such as

  • safe exits from home and neighbourhood
  • meeting places to reunite with family or roommates
  • designated person to pick up children should you be unavailable
  • contact persons (close-by and out-of-town)
  • health information
  • place for your pet to stay
  • risks in your region
  • location of your fire extinguisher, water valve, electrical box, gas valve and floor drain

4. Create an emergency supply kit - There are certain items you need to have regardless of where you ride out a hurricane. It’s important to keep it fully stocked with what you need and for everyone in your home to know where it is kept. You can either buy an assembled kit or create your own from things commonly found in your home. You should also consider an emergency car kit.

Public Safety Canada’s site has details of what to put in your home emergency kit and your car emergency kit.

5. Information sources – Make sure that you know where to get the latest weather forecasts and public announcements from emergency managers. During a disaster, battery-operated radios are the most reliable way to get information. However, in the days leading up to a hurricane, these websites will provide the best up-to-the-minute information:

National:

Provincial Emergency Measures Organizations (EMOs):

Regional Weather Forecasts:

 

 

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General

TORNADOES AND YOUR PETS

posted by Horse Owner Today    |   June 26, 2012 12:18

 

 


Natural Disasters
Tornado situations will often produce anxiety, fear and a need to escape for some pets. Debris displaced by high winds, can cause injury to animals left outdoors. Take preparedness
measures to protect and care for your pet during tornadoes.
Preparing Pets for Tornadoes
• Create an emergency supply kit for your pet, should you need to evacuate your home due to heavy destruction.
□□A 3-5 day supply of food and water for your pet, bowls and a non-electric can opener.
□□Sanitation items, such as a litter box or puppy pads, and disposal equipment.
□□Crates to provide the animal with a secure and safe hiding spot; make sure that the crate is clearly labeled.
□□Leash and collar should you need to transport your pet, carrier for cats.
□□Any medications for pets and all medical records for them as well.
• Identification.
□□All animals should have some sort of identification
(collar with tag, microchip).
□□Take a photo of your pet and keep it with the
medical records.
• Prepare to seek shelter.
□□Practice getting the entire family, including pets, to the tornado safe area during calm weather.
□□Train your dog to go to the area on command or to come to you on command regardless of distractions.
□□Learn how to quickly and safely secure your cat.
□□Know the hiding places of your pet and how to quickly and safely gather your pet.
During a Tornado
• Pet safety.
□□Bring pets indoor well in advance of a storm.
□□NEVER leave pets tied up outside.
□□If they are frightened, reassure them and remain calm.
□□Pets should be provided the same cover as humans during severe weather.
• Put all pets in cages or carriers and in the safe room when a tornado warning is issued.
□□Animals can sense bad weather and will look for a place to hide if they sense it is near.
• NEVER leave your pet chained outside or enclosed in a manner in which they cannot escape danger.
After a Tornado
• Pet behavior.
□□Be aware that a pet’s behavior may change before, during and after a disaster.
□□In the first few hours after the storm, leash your pets when they go outside until they readjust to the situation.
□□Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and your pet may become confused and lost.
• Pet safety.
□□Keep your pet away from storm damaged areas.
□□Power lines could be down and dangerous objects will be littered about everywhere.
• Lost pets.
□□If pets cannot be found after a disaster, contact the local animal control office.
□□Bring along a picture of your pet, if possible.
Development of this educational material was by the Center for Food Security and Public Health with funding from the Multi-State Partnership for Security in Agriculture MOU-2010-HSEMD-004. June 2010.

http://www.prep4agthreats.org/Assets/Factsheets/Tornadoes-and-Your-Pets.pdf

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